The Atheist Delusion

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Matt Barber wrote that The Atheist Delusion "is the most persuasive and captivating answer to atheist questions I've ever seen on film."[1]

The Atheist Delusion is a film documentary produced by the Christian evangelist Ray Comfort which offers evidence for the existence of God to various atheists. The film was released in 2016. It was premiered at the Ark Encounter on October 22, 2016 and released to the public for free the same night. It was available for payment for a few months prior.

The documentary primarily uses the teleological argument for the existence of God (the teleological argument is commonly called the argument from design). The movie focuses on the complexity of DNA which has been called the "book of life" . Comfort argues that just as printed books are intelligently designed, DNA is likewise designed.

Comfort also uses the argument from beauty in the movie and the movie features nature photos.

On October 22, 2016, the full movie was uploaded to YouTube.[2]

Premiere of The Atheist Delusion Aired Live by Daystar TV

The Answers in Genesis website declares about the premiere of the film documentary The Atheist Delusion:

As the number of adherents to atheism increases throughout the western world, Ken Ham, founder and president of Answers in Genesis and visionary behind the Ark Encounter, and Ray Comfort, founder and CEO of Living Waters and cohost of the television program The Way of the Master, want to equip Christians to share the gospel message with atheists. Comfort’s new film The Atheist Delusion does just that, and Ham has offered to host its worldwide premiere at the recently opened Ark Encounter in Northern Kentucky on Saturday, October 22, at 7 p.m. ET.

The Daystar Television Network will broadcast the event (premiere and Q&A) live. Daystar is the largest Christian TV network in America, and broadcasts worldwide to 680 million households in over 200 countries. The Atheist Delusion was screened at a California film festival recently and won in its category. The Atheist Delusion Live Premiere

“We at Answers in Genesis, along with our friends at Living Waters, want to equip believers to share the gospel with any atheists they encounter,” Ham said. “In the new movie from my friend Ray Comfort of Living Waters, The Atheist Delusion, Christians can learn how to start with the idea that God is seen in what He has made—and transition to the message of God’s love for mankind.” Ham added: “Since our Noah’s Ark is all about sharing God’s truths with visitors, I’m thrilled to have the Ark be the venue for the premiere of this gospel film.”

The one-hour movie features on-the-street interviews with atheists as Comfort takes them from the obvious evidence of the Creator seen in the things that are made, then lovingly points out their own sin and rebellion against God, and presents the good news of the gospel of Jesus Christ.[3]

Matt Barber's Christian Post review of The Atheist Delusion

Matt Barber wrote about the movie The Atheist Delusion in the Christian Post:

This is, bar none, the most compelling and comprehensive piece of its kind. I guess I can't even say 'of its kind' because it's totally unique. I've never seen anything so comprehensive. It's visually stunning, winsome, compassionate, intellectually unassailable and moving to the extreme. Somehow you managed, in about an hour, to make the case, beyond any reasonable doubt, for the Creator God, and bring it home to the Truth of Christ. This is your masterpiece. Let me know how I can help you get it out far and wide."

I mean it when I say "The Atheist Delusion" is the most persuasive and captivating answer to atheist questions I've ever seen on film. Without giving too much away, let me just say that non-believers and believers alike will be moved emotionally, spiritually and intellectually. I have no doubt that many who claim atheism at the beginning of the film, will be left well on their way to admitting His existence and infinite glory toward film's end.[4]

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