User talk:Aschlafly

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Protected redirect page

Hello! Sorry to bother you, but I've been through the administrator list and picked you at random. I thought you would be able to edit a protected page which I can't: Conservapedia:Administrators (a redirect). I'd like you to add the text #Administrators after "Guidelines", so the page redirects to Conservapedia:Guidelines#Administrators, which is a more specific and more accurate target. This is a tiny issue, but it's one that bothered me, so I'd be grateful if you could fix it. Chinken 18:53, 21 June 2015 (EDT)

Done as requested. Thanks for your suggestion.--Andy Schlafly 12:56, 27 June 2015 (EDT)

Article for Deletion

Andy, even in an essay we should not allow obviously wrong statements. In Essay:Calming the Storm, there are a couple of falsehoods which the essay is based on. The most obvious one is perhaps:

In the Mark verse above, traditional translations insert the word "said" as though Jesus caused the calming by verbally ordering the sea to be still. But "λέγω" -- the Greek term used for said in some versions -- does not appear in the Greek above,
  • The Greek term appears in the Greek above - it wasn't just recognized by the author of the essay!
  • Therefore, traditional translations have nothing to "insert", they just translate what is present!

That's why I think that essay should be deleted. If you think otherwise, you should make your case, and not just repeatedly erase the {{delete}}-tag: Just ignoring my arguments doesn't prove them wrong - or go away... --AugustO 04:37, 28 June 2015 (EDT)


The verb λέγω is irregular. Here are the tenses for the third person singular indicative active:

3rd Person Indicative Singular Active
Presentλέγειhe says
Aorist εἶπεhe said
Future ἐρεῖhe will say
Perfect εἴρηκεhe has said
Imperfect ἔλεγεhe used to say
Pluperfect ᾐρήκειhe had said

Now look at the sentece: καὶ διεγερθεὶς ἐπετίμησεν τῷ ἀνέμῳ καὶ εἶπεν τῇ θαλάσσῃ, Σιώπα, πεφίμωσο. So, remembering the movable ν, a form of the verb λέγω can be spotted in the verse: the aorist, simply and cleraly meaning "he said". How can you say that ""λέγω" -- the Greek term used for said in some versions -- does not appear in the Greek"? And how can you go on to ignore this mistake?

--AugustO 14:57, 28 June 2015 (EDT)

I removed two false statements from your essay

As you won't do it yourself, I stepped up and removed the following two obviously false statements from your essay:

Is "rebuked" the correct translation of the Greek term "ἐπιτιμάω", which appears in all three verses above and in connection with other miracles, such as Jesus's lifting of the fever in Luke 4:39? The real meaning of the Greek "ἐπιτιμάω" is closer to "judge" than to affirmatively rebuke. The term can even be used in a positive manner, as in "honor" or "raise the price of." The English term "rebuke" carries the primary connotation of a verbal communication, while in the Greek ἐπιτιμάω has the primary connotation of a non-verbal judgment.
In the Mark verse above, traditional translations insert the word "said" as though Jesus caused the calming by verbally ordering the sea to be still. But "λέγω" -- the Greek term used for said in some versions -- does not appear in the Greek above, and where it does appear in Greek versions its real meaning is to "lay", to "cause to lie down," or to "put to sleep." It only has a connotation of speaking when used in a context of verbal communication (as in putting one word with another), which is not the case here.

--AugustO 03:03, 29 June 2015 (EDT)

User:Conservative's editing recently

He's been editing for about 8 hours straight. As the quantity of edits increases, the quality is likely to deteriorate. Perhaps it's time for him to take a break, and you could suggest that a break is worthwhile. Thanks, GregG 17:29, 4 July 2015 (EDT)

GregG, what notable conservative organizations, news organizations, organizations or websites, have cited your articles? GregG, how many page views has your most popular article received? Has the Chicago Tribune ever cited one of your articles in non-critical manner? Has Concerned Women of America ever cited one of your articles? Has one of the largest Christian organizations in the world ever cited one of your articles as a resource to their readers?
By the way, one of my most recent articles Atheism and social justice was shared over 75 times at a popular website and the article is only about a few weeks old.
Instead of concern trolling about the quality of the User: Conservative account edits, why don't you show the editors of the User: Consevative account how its done! Conservative 17:43, 4 July 2015 (EDT)
One last thing: The User: Conservative account will not be muzzled on Independence Day due to a concern troll. Let freedom ring! Conservative 19:19, 4 July 2015 (EDT)
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