Veganism

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Veganism is the following of a diet in which refrains from consuming any animal products, including meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, milk, or honey. It is often thought of as a stricter form of vegetarianism. Vegans also try to avoid use of wool, leather, fur, and other animal-derived products. The basis of veganism is the idea that killing animals for food is only one part of a wider problem of unfair exploitation, and that keeping animals for eggs, wool etc is another form of the same exploitation.

These beliefs are refuted by most, as many believe God placed animals on earth for human consumption and to allow us to prosper. This is not supported by scripture, as Genesis clearly states that God gave man plants and every green thing for food (see Genesis 1:29). God only allowed meat eating after the flood,(see Genesis 9:2-3) as all plant life had been wiped out and the environment was not as suited for hardy plant populations as it was before the flood.

In addition, many mistakenly believe it is impossible to supply all the essential nutrients required by the human body entirely through plant products. In actuality, we could supply more nutrients to people through plants than meat, since it take 16 pounds of grain fed to a cow to make 1 pound of beef. Treating animals as if they are common and expendable objects would be disrespectful to the God who gave us dominion over them. Jesus speaks of compassion, and in the New Testament God is stated by Jesus to look after the needs of animals (see Matthew 6:26). If we are to follow God's example, we must treat animal life with respect.

Animal welfare most closely fits with the morality expressed in the Bible. Eating animals is acceptable, but animals are to be treated with compassion.

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