Walter Scott

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Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) was a Scottish novelist and poet who is most famous for writing Ivanhoe (1820), a novel about a complicated romance in twelfth-century England. Scott is the father of both the regional and historical novels.

It was Scott who wrote, "what a tangled web we weave, when first we practise to deceive!"[1]

Scott was also highly influential in the resurgence of Scottish nationalism, which had been suppressed since the Jacobite rising of 1745, and had a major part in the fabrication of the romantic image of the tartan-kilted Scotsman which we still have today.

Contents

Bibliography

Novels

The Waverley Novels

  • Waverley (1814)
  • Guy Mannering (1815)
  • The Antiquity (1816)
  • Rob Roy (1817)
  • Ivanhoe (1819)
  • The Monastery (1820)
  • The Abbot (1820)
  • Kenilworth (1821)
  • The Pirate (1821)
  • The Fortunes of Nigel (1822)
  • Peveril of the Peak (1823)
  • Quentin Durward (1823)
  • Saint Ronan's Well (1823)
  • Redgauntlet (1824)
  • The Betrothed (1825)
  • The Talisman (1825)
  • Woodstock (1826)
  • Chronicles of the Cannongate (1827)
  • The Fair Maid of Perth (1828)
  • Anne of Geierstein (1829)

Tales of My Landlord

  • The Black Dwarf (1816) First Series
  • The Tale of Old Mortality (1816) First Series
  • The Heart of Midlothian (1818) Second Series
  • The Bride of Lammermoor (1819) Third Series
  • A Legend of Montrose (1819) Third Series
  • Count Robert of Pais (1831) Fourth Series
  • Castle Dangerous (1831) Fourth Series

Miscellaneous Prose

  • Paul's Letters to his Kinfolk (1816)
  • Letters of Malachi Malagrowther (1826)
  • The Life of Napoleon Bonaparte (1827-1828)
  • Tales of a Grandfather (1828-1831)
  • Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft (1830)

Poetry

  • An Apology for Tales of Terror (1799)
  • Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border (1802-1803)
  • The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805)
  • Marmion (1808)
  • The Lady of the Lake (1810)
  • The Vision of Don Roderick (1811)
  • Rokeby (1813)
  • The Bridal of Triermain (1813)
  • The Lord of the Isles (1815)
  • The Field of Waterloo (1815)
  • The Field of Dauntless (1817)

References

  1. Scott's poem entitled Marmion (1808).
  • List of Works [1]

See also

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