World History Homework Ten Answers - Student 4

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Billy F.

Discuss the work of Karl Marx or Charles Darwin, or both.

I find it interesting that a man who couldn’t get a degree in science could be so influential in the field of science years after his death. Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection in 1859, after a trip around the world on the H.M.S. Beagle. He proposed that all life forms started off as simple life forms, getting more complex over millions of years through natural selection. Called absurd by great scientists of the time including Louis Pasteur, Darwin himself said that his theory would die if no “transitional” life forms or fossils were found. None have been found to this day.

Karl Marx and Freidrich Engels endorsed the idea that there should be no private property, and that society would be better off under “communism.” Marx published all of these ideas in his book The Communist Manifesto. His motto was “From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs.”

Excellent analysis, worth 2 answer-credits.

Discuss classical economics or utilitarianism.

Utilitarianism is basically a belief that doing whatever is best for the group as a whole is what should be done. Or that it is better to throw one man off of a sinking boat to save five others. This truly goes against Christian values, as John 15:3 says “There is no greater love than to lay down one’s life for his friends.”

Right. Superb answer.

Explain what nationalism is, providing an example.

Nationalism is one’s loyalty to his country. Nationalists feel that society should not be viewed as being made up of individuals, but as a whole. Nationalism developed at the same time as Romanticism. An example of nationalism is what drove the american colonists during the Revolutionary War. The hope of one whole, unified nation. They had a sense of nationalism before they had a real country!

Superb.
Grade: 40/40. Very good.--Andy Schlafly 11:38, 20 November 2011 (EST)
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