Difference between revisions of "Abstinence education"

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{{cquote|"Abstinence Programs Show Promise in Reducing Sexual Activity and Pregnancy Among Teens," an article printed by Family Research Council, states that an abstinence program for girls in the Washington D.C. area called [[Best Friends]] reported only one out of 400 girls become pregnant since the program began (1). Between 20 and 70 pregnancies are common for the same sized group of fifth to ninth grade girls in the District of Columbia" (1). Upon adopting an abstinence-only curriculum by Teen-Aid, Inc. entitled "Sexuality, Commitment, and Family", at San Marcos Junior High in San Marcos, California, only 20 girls became pregnant in two years compared to 147 girls the year before (1). Nathan Hale Middle School in a Chicago suburb had a number of already pregnant girls at which time they adopted an abstinence program. Many parents were skeptical until the school graduated three pregnancy-free classes in a row (2). <ref>[http://www.unm.edu/~abqteach/hdm/00-02-08.htm "Cost and Benefits of Life-Style Choices", Phyllis Sandoval] </ref>}}
 
{{cquote|"Abstinence Programs Show Promise in Reducing Sexual Activity and Pregnancy Among Teens," an article printed by Family Research Council, states that an abstinence program for girls in the Washington D.C. area called [[Best Friends]] reported only one out of 400 girls become pregnant since the program began (1). Between 20 and 70 pregnancies are common for the same sized group of fifth to ninth grade girls in the District of Columbia" (1). Upon adopting an abstinence-only curriculum by Teen-Aid, Inc. entitled "Sexuality, Commitment, and Family", at San Marcos Junior High in San Marcos, California, only 20 girls became pregnant in two years compared to 147 girls the year before (1). Nathan Hale Middle School in a Chicago suburb had a number of already pregnant girls at which time they adopted an abstinence program. Many parents were skeptical until the school graduated three pregnancy-free classes in a row (2). <ref>[http://www.unm.edu/~abqteach/hdm/00-02-08.htm "Cost and Benefits of Life-Style Choices", Phyllis Sandoval] </ref>}}
  
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==Studies on Effectiveness of Abstinence-Only Education==
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A federal study released in December 2008 found that teenagers who pledged abstinence are just as likely to have premarital sex as those who do not make the pledge.<ref>http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,473509,00.html</ref>  Study author Janet E. Rosenbaum, a post-doctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, used data from a National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health on 934 high school students who had never had sex or had taken a virginity pledge.  In order to remove bias from the analysis, Dr. Rosenbaum did not include teenagers who were unlikely to make a promise to abstain.
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The analysis found that after a five year span, the teens that made a promise to abstain did not differ from teens who had not taken a pledge in rates of premarital sex, or sexually transmitted diseases.  Teens who took the pledge began having sex at the same age as non-pledgers, Rosenbaum said, although they had 0.1 fewer sex partners during the past year then their non-pledger counterparts.  However, pledgers were 10 percent less likely to use condoms or any other form of birth control.  Five years after making the pledge, 80 percent of pledgers denied making such a promise.
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"It seems that pledgers aren't really internalizing the pledge," Rosenbaum said. "Participating in a program doesn't appear to be motivating them to change their behavior. It seems like abstinence has to come from an individual conviction rather than participating in a program." <ref>http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/12/28/AR2008122801588.html?hpid=topnews</ref>
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These findings will be published in the January 2009 issue of the journal ''Pediatrics''.
  
  

Revision as of 11:57, 29 December 2008

Abstinence education encourages unmarried teens to refrain from premarital sex for reasons of emotional, spiritual and physical health.

"Abstinence Programs Show Promise in Reducing Sexual Activity and Pregnancy Among Teens," an article printed by Family Research Council, states that an abstinence program for girls in the Washington D.C. area called Best Friends reported only one out of 400 girls become pregnant since the program began (1). Between 20 and 70 pregnancies are common for the same sized group of fifth to ninth grade girls in the District of Columbia" (1). Upon adopting an abstinence-only curriculum by Teen-Aid, Inc. entitled "Sexuality, Commitment, and Family", at San Marcos Junior High in San Marcos, California, only 20 girls became pregnant in two years compared to 147 girls the year before (1). Nathan Hale Middle School in a Chicago suburb had a number of already pregnant girls at which time they adopted an abstinence program. Many parents were skeptical until the school graduated three pregnancy-free classes in a row (2). [1]

Studies on Effectiveness of Abstinence-Only Education

A federal study released in December 2008 found that teenagers who pledged abstinence are just as likely to have premarital sex as those who do not make the pledge.[2] Study author Janet E. Rosenbaum, a post-doctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, used data from a National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health on 934 high school students who had never had sex or had taken a virginity pledge. In order to remove bias from the analysis, Dr. Rosenbaum did not include teenagers who were unlikely to make a promise to abstain.

The analysis found that after a five year span, the teens that made a promise to abstain did not differ from teens who had not taken a pledge in rates of premarital sex, or sexually transmitted diseases. Teens who took the pledge began having sex at the same age as non-pledgers, Rosenbaum said, although they had 0.1 fewer sex partners during the past year then their non-pledger counterparts. However, pledgers were 10 percent less likely to use condoms or any other form of birth control. Five years after making the pledge, 80 percent of pledgers denied making such a promise.

"It seems that pledgers aren't really internalizing the pledge," Rosenbaum said. "Participating in a program doesn't appear to be motivating them to change their behavior. It seems like abstinence has to come from an individual conviction rather than participating in a program." [3]

These findings will be published in the January 2009 issue of the journal Pediatrics.


Notes

  1. "Cost and Benefits of Life-Style Choices", Phyllis Sandoval
  2. http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,473509,00.html
  3. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/12/28/AR2008122801588.html?hpid=topnews