Difference between revisions of "Abstinence education"

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'''Abstinence education''' encourages unmarried teens to refrain from [[premarital sex]], for reasons of emotional and physical health. <ref> "Abstinence Programs Show Promise in Reducing Sexual Activity and Pregnancy Among Teens," an article printed by Family Research Council, states, an abstinence program for girls in the Washington D.C. area called, [[Best Friends]], reported only one out of 400 girls become pregnant since the program began (1). "[[Elayne Bennett]], director, says that between 20 and 70 pregnancies are common for the same sized group of fifth to ninth grade girls in the District of Columbia" (1). Upon adopting an abstinence-only curriculum by Teen-Aid, Inc., entitled Sexuality, Commitment, and Family, at San Marcos Junior High in San Marcos, California only 20 girls became pregnant in two years compared to 147 girls the year before (1). Nathan Hale Middle School in a Chicago suburb had a number of already pregnant girls at which time they adopted an abstinence program. Many parents were skeptical until the school graduated three pregnancy-free classes in a row (2). [http://www.unm.edu/~abqteach/hdm/00-02-08.htm] </ref>
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'''Abstinence education''' encourages unmarried teens to refrain from [[premarital sex]], for reasons of emotional and physical health. <ref> "Abstinence Programs Show Promise in Reducing Sexual Activity and Pregnancy Among Teens," an article printed by Family Research Council, states, an abstinence program for girls in the Washington D.C. area called, [[Best Friends]], reported only one out of 400 girls become pregnant since the program began (1). "[[Elayne Bennett]], director, says that between 20 and 70 pregnancies are common for the same sized group of fifth to ninth grade girls in the District of Columbia" (1). Upon adopting an abstinence-only curriculum by Teen-Aid, Inc., entitled Sexuality, Commitment, and Family, at San Marcos Junior High in San Marcos, California only 20 girls became pregnant in two years compared to 147 girls the year before (1). Nathan Hale Middle School in a Chicago suburb had a number of already pregnant girls at which time they adopted an abstinence program. Many parents were skeptical until the school graduated three pregnancy-free classes in a row (2). [http://www.unm.edu/~abqteach/hdm/00-02-08.htm] </ref> In April 2005, the [[Journal of Adolescent Health]] reported findings of a study that followed two groups of students comparing the effectiveness of abstinence only education. The result was a drop in the number of sexual partners, but a substantial increase in non-vaginal intercourse. Those who took abstience only education were four times more likely to engage in [[sodomy]] and six times more likely to engage in [[oral sex]]. They were also less likely to use a condom and less likely to seek STD testing or treatment. It was funded in part by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the [[Centers for Disease Control and Prevention]]. The same researchers also previously found that 88% of students who undergo abstinence education have sex before marriage, as opposed to 99% of the rest of the population.<ref> "Study: Abstinence pledges may trigger risky sexual behavior", an article by USA Today describing a study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health</ref>
  
 
==Notes==
 
==Notes==

Revision as of 13:14, 7 September 2007

Abstinence education encourages unmarried teens to refrain from premarital sex, for reasons of emotional and physical health. [1] In April 2005, the Journal of Adolescent Health reported findings of a study that followed two groups of students comparing the effectiveness of abstinence only education. The result was a drop in the number of sexual partners, but a substantial increase in non-vaginal intercourse. Those who took abstience only education were four times more likely to engage in sodomy and six times more likely to engage in oral sex. They were also less likely to use a condom and less likely to seek STD testing or treatment. It was funded in part by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The same researchers also previously found that 88% of students who undergo abstinence education have sex before marriage, as opposed to 99% of the rest of the population.[2]

Notes

  1. "Abstinence Programs Show Promise in Reducing Sexual Activity and Pregnancy Among Teens," an article printed by Family Research Council, states, an abstinence program for girls in the Washington D.C. area called, Best Friends, reported only one out of 400 girls become pregnant since the program began (1). "Elayne Bennett, director, says that between 20 and 70 pregnancies are common for the same sized group of fifth to ninth grade girls in the District of Columbia" (1). Upon adopting an abstinence-only curriculum by Teen-Aid, Inc., entitled Sexuality, Commitment, and Family, at San Marcos Junior High in San Marcos, California only 20 girls became pregnant in two years compared to 147 girls the year before (1). Nathan Hale Middle School in a Chicago suburb had a number of already pregnant girls at which time they adopted an abstinence program. Many parents were skeptical until the school graduated three pregnancy-free classes in a row (2). [1]
  2. "Study: Abstinence pledges may trigger risky sexual behavior", an article by USA Today describing a study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health