Difference between revisions of "Aid and abet"

(Apparently US law has a very different interpretation of this term to what I am used to, apologies if this isn't quite accurate.)
 
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To '''aid and abet''' is to intentionally and knowingly assist in or encourage the commission of a crime.  Generally speaking and aider or abettor is considered a '''party''' to the offence, compared to the perpetrator who is the '''principle'''.  Whilst jurisdictions vary, many common law jurisdictions apply a maximum sentence that is exactly half that of a principle offender.   
 
To '''aid and abet''' is to intentionally and knowingly assist in or encourage the commission of a crime.  Generally speaking and aider or abettor is considered a '''party''' to the offence, compared to the perpetrator who is the '''principle'''.  Whilst jurisdictions vary, many common law jurisdictions apply a maximum sentence that is exactly half that of a principle offender.   
  
An aider or abettor can be contrasted with an accomplice to a crime (such as a getaway driver) who will generally be considered a principle offender.  The distinction arises from the passive nature of the encouragement or assistance given.   
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An aider or abettor can be contrasted with an [[accomplice]] to a crime (such as a getaway driver) who will generally be considered a principle offender.  The distinction arises from the passive nature of the encouragement or assistance given.   
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See also [[Accomplice]] and [[Accessory]]
 
  
 
  [[Category:Legal Terms]]
 
  [[Category:Legal Terms]]

Latest revision as of 02:32, 24 December 2012

To aid and abet is to intentionally and knowingly assist in or encourage the commission of a crime. Generally speaking and aider or abettor is considered a party to the offence, compared to the perpetrator who is the principle. Whilst jurisdictions vary, many common law jurisdictions apply a maximum sentence that is exactly half that of a principle offender.

An aider or abettor can be contrasted with an accomplice to a crime (such as a getaway driver) who will generally be considered a principle offender. The distinction arises from the passive nature of the encouragement or assistance given.