Difference between revisions of "Alfred Dreyfus"

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'''Alfred Dreyfus''' (1859-1935) was a [[French]] army officer falsely accused of spying in the late 1800s.  The charges, conviction and initial refusal by the government to admit its error had overtones of [[Anti-Semitism]], as Dreyfus was [[Jewish]].<ref>http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/anti-semitism/Dreyfus.html</ref> In 1895, he was sentenced to spend life imprisoned on [[Devil's Island]] off the coast of French Guiana, but he was pardoned four years later.  The incident has become known in history as the '''Dreyfus Affair'''.
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'''Alfred Dreyfus''' (1859-1935) was a [[French]] army officer falsely accused of spying in the late 1800s.  The charges, conviction and initial refusal by the government to admit its error had overtones of [[Anti-Semitism]], as Dreyfus was [[Jewish]].<ref>http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/anti-semitism/Dreyfus.html</ref> In 1895, he was sentenced to spend life imprisoned on [[Devil's Island]] off the coast of French Guiana.
  
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The '''Dreyfuss Affair''' became a central issue in French politics, with critics like [[Émile Zola]] --who cired "[[J'accuse]]"--insisting it was a miscarriage of justice brought by a conspiracy of Catholic army officers. Dreyfuss was proven innocent and released in 1899.
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==Further reading==
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* Bredin, Jean-Denis. ''The Affair: The Case of Alfred Dreyfus.'' (1986). 551 pp.
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* Griffiths, Richard. ''The Use of Abuse: The Polemics of the Dreyfus Affair and Its Aftermath.'' (1991). 207 pp.
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* Kleeblatt, Norman L., ed. ''The Dreyfus Affair: Art, Truth, and Justice.'' (1987). 315 pp.
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* Zola, Emile. ''The Dreyfus Affair: "J'Accuse" and Other Writings.'' (1996). 202 pp.
  
'''References:'''
 
  
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====References====
 
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Revision as of 11:01, 28 March 2009

Alfred Dreyfus (1859-1935) was a French army officer falsely accused of spying in the late 1800s. The charges, conviction and initial refusal by the government to admit its error had overtones of Anti-Semitism, as Dreyfus was Jewish.[1] In 1895, he was sentenced to spend life imprisoned on Devil's Island off the coast of French Guiana.

The Dreyfuss Affair became a central issue in French politics, with critics like Émile Zola --who cired "J'accuse"--insisting it was a miscarriage of justice brought by a conspiracy of Catholic army officers. Dreyfuss was proven innocent and released in 1899.

Further reading

  • Bredin, Jean-Denis. The Affair: The Case of Alfred Dreyfus. (1986). 551 pp.
  • Griffiths, Richard. The Use of Abuse: The Polemics of the Dreyfus Affair and Its Aftermath. (1991). 207 pp.
  • Kleeblatt, Norman L., ed. The Dreyfus Affair: Art, Truth, and Justice. (1987). 315 pp.
  • Zola, Emile. The Dreyfus Affair: "J'Accuse" and Other Writings. (1996). 202 pp.


References

  1. http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/anti-semitism/Dreyfus.html