Atheistic China and alcoholism

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In 2013, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported: "High-risk drinking behaviour has reached epidemic proportions in China."[1]

China has the world's largest atheist population.[2][3]

In 2013, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported:

In China, alcohol consumption is increasing faster than other parts of the world. Data from recent decades show a steady increase in alcohol production and consumption and in rates of alcohol-related conditions. These dramatic increases, noted after the 1980s, stem from China’s fast economic development and the parallel rise in average income level.

A recent national survey of drinking in China revealed that 55.6% of the men and 15.0% of the women were current drinkers. Among respondents who endorsed alcohol consumption, 62.7% of the men and 51.0% of the women reported excessive drinking, 26.3% and 7.8%, respectively, reported frequent drinking, and 57.3% and 26.6%, respectively, reported binge drinking. These figures show that China has experienced dramatic increases in the consumption of alcoholic beverages since the late 1970s and even the 1990s. High-risk drinking behaviour has reached epidemic proportions in China.[4]

In 2011, The Guardian reported that there is a rise in binge drinking in China.[5]

See also

References

  1. Alcohol and alcohol-related harm in China: policy changes needed
  2. Top 50 Countries With Highest Proportion of Atheists / Agnostics (Zuckerman, 2005)
  3. A surprising map of where the world’s atheists live, Washington Post By Max Fisher and Caitlin Dewey May 23, 2013
  4. Alcohol and alcohol-related harm in China: policy changes needed
  5. The rise of binge drinking in China by Tania Branigan, The Guardian, 2011