Difference between revisions of "Bagatelle"

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A '''bagatelle''' is a short, light, seemingly inconsequential piece of music.  The term in both [[France|French]] and [[Germany|German]] means ''“trifle”'' and first appeared musically in relation to [[Francois Couperin]] in the late seventeenth/early eighteenth centuries.  
 
A '''bagatelle''' is a short, light, seemingly inconsequential piece of music.  The term in both [[France|French]] and [[Germany|German]] means ''“trifle”'' and first appeared musically in relation to [[Francois Couperin]] in the late seventeenth/early eighteenth centuries.  
  
[[Beethoven]] wrote three sets of bagatelles - from one of them comes one of the most recognisable pieces of classical music: ''“Fur Elise”''. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mVW8tgGY_w)  A young [[Camille Saint-Saens]] wrote a set. The Hungarian master, [[Béla Bartók]], in his own unique style, wrote 14 of them, like Saint-Saens, for piano. Turning to other forces, in England, [[William Walton]] wrote  five bagatelles for solo guitar, a work once neglected but now gaining popularity with an increasing number of recordings - and even a concertante arrangement  – and [[Gerald Finzi]]’s set of six for [[clarinet]] and string orchestra gives the form a comfortable pastoral feel.  
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[[Beethoven]] wrote three sets of bagatelles - from one of them comes one of the most recognisable pieces of classical music: ''“Fur Elise”''. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mVW8tgGY_w)  A young [[Camille Saint-Saens]] wrote a set. The Hungarian master, [[Béla Bartók]], in his own unique style, wrote 14 of them, like Saint-Saens, for piano. Turning to other forces, in England, [[William Walton]] wrote  five bagatelles for solo guitar, a work once neglected but now gaining in popularity with an increasing number of recordings - and even a concertante arrangement  – and [[Gerald Finzi]]’s set of six for [[clarinet]] and [[piano]] - later arranged with string orchestra - gives the form a comfortable pastoral feel.  
  
 
One of the most popular [[chamber music|chamber]] works of all time is [[Antonin Dvorak]]’s  Bagatelles (op.47) for [[harmonium]], 2 [[violin]]s and [[cello]]; simple, charming and cheerful music that is a fine example of what can be called “household music” – pieces written for a particular group of friends or family using the instruments available to them.
 
One of the most popular [[chamber music|chamber]] works of all time is [[Antonin Dvorak]]’s  Bagatelles (op.47) for [[harmonium]], 2 [[violin]]s and [[cello]]; simple, charming and cheerful music that is a fine example of what can be called “household music” – pieces written for a particular group of friends or family using the instruments available to them.
  
 
[[Category:Musical forms]]
 
[[Category:Musical forms]]

Revision as of 14:52, 24 January 2013

A bagatelle is a short, light, seemingly inconsequential piece of music. The term in both French and German means “trifle” and first appeared musically in relation to Francois Couperin in the late seventeenth/early eighteenth centuries.

Beethoven wrote three sets of bagatelles - from one of them comes one of the most recognisable pieces of classical music: “Fur Elise”. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mVW8tgGY_w) A young Camille Saint-Saens wrote a set. The Hungarian master, Béla Bartók, in his own unique style, wrote 14 of them, like Saint-Saens, for piano. Turning to other forces, in England, William Walton wrote five bagatelles for solo guitar, a work once neglected but now gaining in popularity with an increasing number of recordings - and even a concertante arrangement – and Gerald Finzi’s set of six for clarinet and piano - later arranged with string orchestra - gives the form a comfortable pastoral feel.

One of the most popular chamber works of all time is Antonin Dvorak’s Bagatelles (op.47) for harmonium, 2 violins and cello; simple, charming and cheerful music that is a fine example of what can be called “household music” – pieces written for a particular group of friends or family using the instruments available to them.