Better Business Bureau's Wise Giving Alliance review of the Freedom From Religion Foundation

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Annie Laurie Gaylor is an atheist feminist. She is co-president of the Freedom From Religion Foundation. Gaylor’s husband, Dan Barker, who heads the organization along with her, is usually the person invited to speaking engagements, despite her longer tenure as the organization’s leader and her many books on atheism.[1] See also: Atheism and women

According to the Better Business Bureau's Wise Giving Alliance's website, the Freedom From Religion Foundation fails to meet the Business Bureau's Wise Giving Alliance's standards as of May 4, 2018.[2]

The Better Business Bureau's Wise Giving Alliance's website indicated on May 4, 2018:

Freedom from Religion Foundation does not meet the following 2 Standards for Charity Accountability:

Standard 1 (Oversight of Operations and Staff) Organizations shall have a board of directors that provides adequate oversight of the charity's operations and its staff. Indication of adequate oversight includes, but is not limited to, regularly scheduled appraisals of the CEO's performance, evidence of disbursement controls such as board approval of the budget, fund raising practices, establishment of a conflict of interest policy, and establishment of accounting procedures sufficient to safeguard charity finances.

FFRF does not meet this Standard because its board of directors does not:

Review the performance of the chief executive officer at least once every two years.

Standard 7 (Board Approval of Written Report on Effectiveness) Submit to the organization's governing body, for its approval, a written report that outlines the results of the aforementioned performance and effectiveness assessment and recommendations for future actions.

FFRF does not meet this Standard because:

Although it has produced a written effectiveness assessment report in October 2015, the report did not include recommendations for future actions.[3]

See also

References

  1. Bekiempis, Victoria (Summer 2011). "Why the New Atheism is a boys' club". Bitch Magazine, no. 51. Retrieved from September 26, 2011 edition of The Guardian/CommentaryIsFree.
  2. CHARITY REVIEWIssued: June 2016 Expires: September 2018 Freedom from Religion Foundation,May 4, 2018
  3. CHARITY REVIEWIssued: June 2016 Expires: September 2018 Freedom from Religion Foundation, May 4, 2018