Difference between revisions of "Camptown Races"

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(Created page with "'''"Camptown Races"''' is an American pop song by Stephen Foster, written in the 19th century.<ref>Blood, Peter, and Annie Patterson. ''Rise Up Singing''.</ref> It is a...")
 
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'''"Camptown Races"''' is an American pop song by [[Stephen Foster]], written in the 19th century.<ref>Blood, Peter, and Annie Patterson.  ''Rise Up Singing''.</ref>  It is a minstrel song, and many have accused it of being racist and mocking the accent of the Southern black.<ref name="song">http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=13639</ref>  It is true that in [https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/44254 the lyrics], there is spelling mimicking the pronunciation of a southern black, but this was common in songs of the time which were meant to be sung by men in blackface.<ref name="song"></ref>
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'''"Camptown Races"''' is an American popular song by [[Stephen Foster]], written in the 19th century.<ref>Blood, Peter, and Annie Patterson.  ''Rise Up Singing''.</ref>  It is a minstrel song, and many have accused it of being racist and mocking the accent of the Southern black.<ref name="song">http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=13639</ref>  It is true that in [https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/44254 the lyrics], there is spelling mimicking the pronunciation of a southern black, but this was common in songs of the time which were meant to be sung by men in blackface.<ref name="song"></ref>
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
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*[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdZliSDhgXY Song] arranged by Peter Adamson, on YouTube
 
*[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdZliSDhgXY Song] arranged by Peter Adamson, on YouTube
  
[[Category:Pop Songs]][[Category:Folk Songs]]
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[[Category:Popular Songs]][[Category:Folk Songs]]

Revision as of 22:24, 26 April 2017

"Camptown Races" is an American popular song by Stephen Foster, written in the 19th century.[1] It is a minstrel song, and many have accused it of being racist and mocking the accent of the Southern black.[2] It is true that in the lyrics, there is spelling mimicking the pronunciation of a southern black, but this was common in songs of the time which were meant to be sung by men in blackface.[2]

References

  1. Blood, Peter, and Annie Patterson. Rise Up Singing.
  2. 2.0 2.1 http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=13639

External Links

  • Song arranged by Peter Adamson, on YouTube