Difference between revisions of "Conjugate base"

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A '''conjugate base''' is the negatively charged [[ion]] which results from an [[acid]] donating a [[proton]] (H<sup>+</sup>). This ion acts as a [[base]], with a strength inverse to the strength of the original acid. An example conjugate base is a [[nitrate]] ion (NO<sub>3</sub><sup>-</sup>), which is formed when [[nitric acid]] (HNO<sub>3</sub>) gives up its proton.
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Consider the pair of molecules HX and X<sup></sup>. X<sup>−</sup> can react to form HX, and vice versa, through an [[acid-base reaction]]. Thus, X<sup></sup> is the conjugate base of HX (and HX is the conjugate acid of X<sup></sup>.)
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X<sup></sup> acts as a base, with a strength inversely proportional to the strength of its conjugate acid.
  
 
==See Also==
 
==See Also==

Revision as of 17:54, 2 August 2009

Consider the pair of molecules HX and X. X can react to form HX, and vice versa, through an acid-base reaction. Thus, X is the conjugate base of HX (and HX is the conjugate acid of X.)

X acts as a base, with a strength inversely proportional to the strength of its conjugate acid.

See Also