Difference between revisions of "Consumer confidence"

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The '''consumer confidence''' index is a monthly survey of [[public]] [[attitude]]s toward the [[economy]].  It is compared to the optimism of the nation in 1985, which was arbitrarily given a score of 100<ref>http://www.investopedia.com/articles/05/010604.asp#axzz2JOM76wtf</ref>.  Hence a score below 100 means the public is less confident in the economy, and a score above 100 means the public is more confident. The highest ever recorded on the consumer confidence index was a 144.7 in January, 2000 during the presidency of [[Bill Clinton]].<ref name="ccirecords">http://www.pollingreport.com/consumer.htm#Conference</ref><ref>http://www.nytimes.com/2000/01/26/news/26iht-usecon.2.t_5.html</ref> By contrast, the lowest ever recorded on the consumer confidence index was a 25.3 in February, 2003 during the [[George W. Bush]] administration.<ref name="ccirecords"/>
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The '''consumer confidence''' index is a monthly survey of [[public]] [[attitude]]s towards the [[economy]].  It is compared to the optimism of the nation in 1985, which was arbitrarily given a score of 100<ref>http://www.investopedia.com/articles/05/010604.asp#axzz2JOM76wtf</ref>.  Hence a score below 100 means the public is less confident about the economy, while a score above 100 means the public is more confident. The highest ever recorded response to the consumer confidence index was a 144.7 in January, 2000 during the presidency of [[Bill Clinton]]<ref name="ccirecords">http://www.pollingreport.com/consumer.htm#Conference</ref>, with 54% of the households surveyed describing employment opportunities as "plentiful"<ref>http://www.nytimes.com/2000/01/26/news/26iht-usecon.2.t_5.html</ref>. By contrast, the lowest ever recorded on the consumer confidence index was a 25.3 in February, 2003 during the [[George W. Bush]] administration.<ref name="ccirecords"/>
 
This monthly report is watched closely by stock market traders and politicians.
 
This monthly report is watched closely by stock market traders and politicians.
 
[[category:economics]]
 
[[category:economics]]

Latest revision as of 06:42, 30 January 2013

The consumer confidence index is a monthly survey of public attitudes towards the economy. It is compared to the optimism of the nation in 1985, which was arbitrarily given a score of 100[1]. Hence a score below 100 means the public is less confident about the economy, while a score above 100 means the public is more confident. The highest ever recorded response to the consumer confidence index was a 144.7 in January, 2000 during the presidency of Bill Clinton[2], with 54% of the households surveyed describing employment opportunities as "plentiful"[3]. By contrast, the lowest ever recorded on the consumer confidence index was a 25.3 in February, 2003 during the George W. Bush administration.[2] This monthly report is watched closely by stock market traders and politicians.

References