Difference between revisions of "Continental drift"

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'''Continental drift''' explains how the [[Earth]] once had a [[Pangaea|single large land mass]] which broke into [[continent]]s that continued to separate, and that they still move slowly today.   
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The '''Continental drift''' theory asserts that the [[Earth]] had a single large land mass which broke into [[continent]]s that continued to separate, and that they still move slowly today.  The breaking up of one land mass into the separate continents was first proposed by [[creationist]] [[Antonio Snider]] in 1859,<ref name="Snider">Batten, Don, et. al., The Creation Answers Book, chapter 11: [http://creationontheweb.com/images/pdfs/cabook/chapter11.pdf What about continental drift?], p. 157, 2007</ref> then later by [[Alfred Wegener]] in the 1930s, but the idea wasn't widely accepted until the 1960s.<ref name="Snider" />  
The breaking up of one land mass into the separate continents was first proposed by the [[France|French]] [[creation scientist]] [[Antonio Snider]] in 1859,<ref name="Snider">Batten, Don, et. al., The Creation Answers Book, chapter 11: [http://creationontheweb.com/images/pdfs/cabook/chapter11.pdf What about continental drift?], p. 157, 2007</ref> who astutely observed an almost perfect match between the coastlines of western [[Africa]] and eastern [[South America]], which suggested they had once been joined. The idea was later taken up by [[Alfred Wegener]] in the 1930s."<ref name=wcd> [http://www.scientus.org/Wegener-Continental-Drift.html Wegener and Continental Drift Theory]</ref> [[Atheists]] mocked the concept for about 100 years (see [[scientific bias]]), until finally accepting its truth in the 1960s.<ref name="Snider" />  
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Although Snider and Wegener did not have an explanation of the cause of continental drift, the rigid discipline of [[creation science]] allied with [[Faith and science|faith and logic]] eventually enabled creation scientist to interpret [[Biblical scientific foreknowledge]] in order to explain how a relatively recent cataclysmic event caused the separation of the still-moving continents from one land mass. Genesis 1:9-10 describes how all of dry land was in one place.<ref>http://www.christiananswers.net/q-aig/aig-c001.html#1</ref> The continental drift occurring after the [[Great Flood]] when the earth was divided (Genesis 10:25).
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It had long been noticed that some continents seem to fit together like a [[jigsaw]], especially the west coast of Europe and Africa and the east coasts of the Americas, but it was Snider who first proposed the idea that the continents had actually moved, and he did so based partly on the account in {{Bible ref|Genesis|1|9-10}}.<ref name="Snider" />
  
Atheistic [[science]] rejects the Biblical truth and instead applies [[liberal logic]] to concoct a [[junk science]] explanation based on the present observed rate of continental drift, which came to the tenuous conclusion that the continents that we know today were part of a single land mass about 250 million years ago. Clearly impossible because that predates [[creation]].
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The theory of continental drift is notable in that mainstream scientists dismissed the theory for many decades, finally taking a look at the evidence for it after nearly an entire generation had passed (see [[scientific bias]]).
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*"The reactions by the leading authorities in the different disciplines was so strong and so negative that serious discussion of the concept stopped."<ref name=wcd> [http://www.scientus.org/Wegener-Continental-Drift.html Wegener and Continental Drift Theory]</ref>
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Like [[Semmelweis]], "Wegener did not have an explanation for how continental drift could have occurred."<ref name=wcd />
  
 
== Reference ==
 
== Reference ==

Revision as of 16:33, 19 February 2011

The Continental drift theory asserts that the Earth had a single large land mass which broke into continents that continued to separate, and that they still move slowly today. The breaking up of one land mass into the separate continents was first proposed by creationist Antonio Snider in 1859,[1] then later by Alfred Wegener in the 1930s, but the idea wasn't widely accepted until the 1960s.[1]

It had long been noticed that some continents seem to fit together like a jigsaw, especially the west coast of Europe and Africa and the east coasts of the Americas, but it was Snider who first proposed the idea that the continents had actually moved, and he did so based partly on the account in Genesis 1:9-10 .[1]

The theory of continental drift is notable in that mainstream scientists dismissed the theory for many decades, finally taking a look at the evidence for it after nearly an entire generation had passed (see scientific bias).

  • "The reactions by the leading authorities in the different disciplines was so strong and so negative that serious discussion of the concept stopped."[2]

Like Semmelweis, "Wegener did not have an explanation for how continental drift could have occurred."[2]

Reference

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Batten, Don, et. al., The Creation Answers Book, chapter 11: What about continental drift?, p. 157, 2007
  2. 2.0 2.1 Wegener and Continental Drift Theory