Difference between revisions of "Continuous Inspection"

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(New page: USDA’s meat and poultry inspection system is often called “continuous” because no animal destined for human food may be slaughtered or dressed unless an inspector is present to exami...)
 
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USDA’s meat and poultry inspection system is often called “continuous” because no animal destined for human food may be slaughtered or dressed unless an inspector is present to examine it before slaughter (antemortem inspection), and its carcass and parts after slaughter (postmortem inspection). In processing plants, as opposed to slaughter plants, inspectors need not be present at all times, but they do visit at least once daily. Processing inspection is also considered continuous.
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[[USDA]]'s meat and poultry inspection system is often called '''"continuous"''' because no [[animal]] destined for human food may be slaughtered or dressed unless an inspector is present to examine it before slaughter (antemortem inspection), and its carcass and parts after slaughter (postmortem inspection). In processing plants, as opposed to slaughter plants, inspectors need not be present at all times, but they do visit at least once daily. Processing inspection is also considered continuous.
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
[http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Help/A-Z_Index/index.asp USDA Index]
 
[http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Help/A-Z_Index/index.asp USDA Index]

Revision as of 23:55, 13 November 2007

USDA's meat and poultry inspection system is often called "continuous" because no animal destined for human food may be slaughtered or dressed unless an inspector is present to examine it before slaughter (antemortem inspection), and its carcass and parts after slaughter (postmortem inspection). In processing plants, as opposed to slaughter plants, inspectors need not be present at all times, but they do visit at least once daily. Processing inspection is also considered continuous.

References

USDA Index