Difference between revisions of "Empirical science"

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(faith in doctrinal commitment vs. experience)
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'''Empirical science''' is based on the [[scientific method]] that requires from the scientist to test a [[theory]] based on observed or predicted facts. The scientist must formulate a theory or a [[hypothesis]] based on what has been observed, then design a test by which the theory may be verified as valid or not.<ref>{{cite web
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'''Empirical science''' is based on the [[scientific method]] that requires from the scientist to test a [[theory]] based on [[Scientific observation|observed]] or predicted facts. The scientist must formulate a theory or a [[hypothesis]] based on what has been observed, then design a test by which the theory may be verified as valid or not.<ref>{{cite web
 
|url=http://www.icr.org/scientific-method/
 
|url=http://www.icr.org/scientific-method/
 
|title=Empirical Science Is Observable
 
|title=Empirical Science Is Observable
 
|publisher=the Institute for Creation Research
 
|publisher=the Institute for Creation Research
|access date=16/2/2012}}</ref> Knowledge and data acquired in empirical science is based entirely on experience and repeatable observations. Modern science has [[empiricism]] as its philosophical foundation.
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|access date=16/2/2012}}</ref> Knowledge and data acquired in empirical science is based entirely on experience and repeatable observations. Modern science has [[empiricism]] as its philosophical foundation.  
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If adherents of a theory or hypothesis continue believing it despite it cannot survive a confrontation with experience, then such attitude is usually referred to as ''faith in [[Doctrine|doctrinal]] commitment''. For example, a  faith in [[planned economy]] or in [[junk DNA]] have been proposed to fall into such category.<ref name="DeniableDarwin">{{cite book
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|author=David Berlinski
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|title=The Deniable Darwin
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|publisher=Discovery Institute Press (reprinted from ''Commentary'' February 1998 by permission)
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|location=Seattle, USA
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|year=2009
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|pages=308
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|chapter=Has Darwin met his match?
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|isbn=978-0-9790141-2-3
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|url=http://www.davidberlinski.org/deniable-darwin/about.php
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|quote=}}</ref><ref>{{cite book
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|title=The Myth of Junk DNA
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|author=Jonathan Wells
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|publisher=Discovery Institute Press
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|year=2011
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|isbn=978-1-9365990-0-4
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|url=http://books.google.com/books?id=Rc4ikgAACAAJ&dq=The+Myth+Of+junk+DNA&hl=en&sa=X&ei=cXYXUd_GAuTw4QSX_4GQAg&redir_esc=y
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}}</ref>
  
 
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Revision as of 06:36, 10 February 2013

Empirical science is based on the scientific method that requires from the scientist to test a theory based on observed or predicted facts. The scientist must formulate a theory or a hypothesis based on what has been observed, then design a test by which the theory may be verified as valid or not.[1] Knowledge and data acquired in empirical science is based entirely on experience and repeatable observations. Modern science has empiricism as its philosophical foundation. If adherents of a theory or hypothesis continue believing it despite it cannot survive a confrontation with experience, then such attitude is usually referred to as faith in doctrinal commitment. For example, a faith in planned economy or in junk DNA have been proposed to fall into such category.[2][3]

See also

References

  1. Empirical Science Is Observable. the Institute for Creation Research.
  2. David Berlinski (2009). "Has Darwin met his match?", The Deniable Darwin. Seattle, USA: Discovery Institute Press (reprinted from Commentary February 1998 by permission), 308. ISBN 978-0-9790141-2-3. 
  3. Jonathan Wells (2011). The Myth of Junk DNA. Discovery Institute Press. ISBN 978-1-9365990-0-4.