Difference between revisions of "Entropy"

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Entropy is the thermodynamic property which trends toward equilibrium, first postulated by [[Lazare Carnot]] in 1803.  
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Entropy is the tendency of everything to trend toward greater disorder, in the absence of intelligent intervention.
  
The [[second law of thermodynamics]] states that entropy will never decrease over time within a [[closed system]], defining a closed system as one in which neither matter nor energy may enter or leave.
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The [[second law of thermodynamics]] states that entropy will never decrease over time within a [[closed system]], defining a closed system as one in which neither matter nor energy may enter or leave.<ref>As first postulated by Lazare Carnot in 1803, entropy is the thermodynamic property which trends toward equilibrium.<ref>
  
 
Entropy is undeniable and yet creates perhaps insurmountable difficulties for many modern theories of physics.  For example, it renders time asymmetric, resulting in an [[arrow of time]] that is difficult to reconcile with the [[theory of relativity]].  Entropy casts doubt on whether physical laws or the speed of light are invariant and perpetual.   
 
Entropy is undeniable and yet creates perhaps insurmountable difficulties for many modern theories of physics.  For example, it renders time asymmetric, resulting in an [[arrow of time]] that is difficult to reconcile with the [[theory of relativity]].  Entropy casts doubt on whether physical laws or the speed of light are invariant and perpetual.   

Revision as of 11:05, 7 March 2013

Entropy is the tendency of everything to trend toward greater disorder, in the absence of intelligent intervention.

The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy will never decrease over time within a closed system, defining a closed system as one in which neither matter nor energy may enter or leave.Cite error: Closing </ref> missing for <ref> tag