Difference between revisions of "Enzyme"

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An '''enzyme''' is a [[protein]] produced by a living organism that functions as a [[catalyst]]. Enzymes increase the speed and likelihood of chemical reactions within an organism's body by lowering the activation energy necessary for a reaction to occur. They are essential to all cellular functions, and life as we know it could not exist without them.
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An '''enzyme''' is a [[protein]] produced by a living organism that functions as a [[catalyst]].  
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== Mechanism ==
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Enzymes increase the speed and likelihood of chemical reactions within an organism's body by lowering the activation energy necessary for a reaction to occur. This happens because the enzyme selects the particular configuration of the substrate and bends the bonds into the energetically-favorable orientation, with a consequent decrease in entropy. They are essential to all cellular functions, and most life could not exist without them, although viruses lack enzymes, but use them from their host cell.<ref>http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=3266</ref> The active site, a three-dimensional structure, is the only region of the enzyme that binds to the substrate. It permits only a particular substrate to bind to the site.<ref>https://www.britannica.com/science/enzyme</ref>
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== References ==
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<references/>
  
 
[[Category:Reaction Kinetics]]
 
[[Category:Reaction Kinetics]]
 
[[Category:Organic Chemistry]]
 
[[Category:Organic Chemistry]]
 
[[Category:Biochemistry]]
 
[[Category:Biochemistry]]

Latest revision as of 13:08, 15 October 2016

An enzyme is a protein produced by a living organism that functions as a catalyst.

Mechanism

Enzymes increase the speed and likelihood of chemical reactions within an organism's body by lowering the activation energy necessary for a reaction to occur. This happens because the enzyme selects the particular configuration of the substrate and bends the bonds into the energetically-favorable orientation, with a consequent decrease in entropy. They are essential to all cellular functions, and most life could not exist without them, although viruses lack enzymes, but use them from their host cell.[1] The active site, a three-dimensional structure, is the only region of the enzyme that binds to the substrate. It permits only a particular substrate to bind to the site.[2]

References

  1. http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=3266
  2. https://www.britannica.com/science/enzyme