Difference between revisions of "Franz Xaver Winterhalter"

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[[File:Franz Xaver Winterhalter.jpg|right|170px]]
 
'''Franz Xaver Winterhalter''' (Menzenschwand, 1805 – Frankfurt am Main, 1873) was a German Academic [[painter]] and lithographer. He was famous by his [[portrait]] of royalty in the mid-nineteenth century; during his career he painted most of Europe’s royalty and leading figures of the aristocracy. In 1835, he painted the portrait of Grand Duke Leopold of Baden, and for that portrait Winterhalter was appointed court painter and his international career was launched. Winterhalter also became the chief painter of court of France under [[Napoleon III]].  
 
'''Franz Xaver Winterhalter''' (Menzenschwand, 1805 – Frankfurt am Main, 1873) was a German Academic [[painter]] and lithographer. He was famous by his [[portrait]] of royalty in the mid-nineteenth century; during his career he painted most of Europe’s royalty and leading figures of the aristocracy. In 1835, he painted the portrait of Grand Duke Leopold of Baden, and for that portrait Winterhalter was appointed court painter and his international career was launched. Winterhalter also became the chief painter of court of France under [[Napoleon III]].  
  

Revision as of 09:41, 25 April 2013

Franz Xaver Winterhalter.jpg

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (Menzenschwand, 1805 – Frankfurt am Main, 1873) was a German Academic painter and lithographer. He was famous by his portrait of royalty in the mid-nineteenth century; during his career he painted most of Europe’s royalty and leading figures of the aristocracy. In 1835, he painted the portrait of Grand Duke Leopold of Baden, and for that portrait Winterhalter was appointed court painter and his international career was launched. Winterhalter also became the chief painter of court of France under Napoleon III.

Winterhalter's portraits were prized for their subtle intimacy, but his popularity among patrons came from his ability to create the image his sitters wished or needed to project to their subjects. [1]

See also

External links