Difference between revisions of "Frederick Douglass"

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[[image:Freddouglas.jpg|150px|thumb|Frederick Douglass]]
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{{Infobox person
'''Frederick Douglass''' (1818-1895), born as Frederick Baily, was raised as a [[slave]].  He escaped to [[Massachusetts]] at age 20 and changed his name to Frederick Douglass in order to conceal himself from slave catchers.  
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| name        = Frederick Douglass
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| image       = Freddouglas.jpg
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| birth_date  = February, 1818
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| birth_place = Maryland
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| death_date  = February 20, 1895
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| death_place = Washington D.C.
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| nationality = American
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| spouse      = Anna Murray-Douglass<br />
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Helen Pitts Douglass
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| religion    = Christian
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}}
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'''Frederick Douglass''' (1818-1895), born as Frederick Baily, was raised as a [[slave]].  He escaped to [[Massachusetts]] at age 20 and changed his name to Frederick Douglass in order to conceal himself from slave catchers. He was a member of the [[Republican Party]].
  
He developed marvelous [[debate|debating]] and [[oration|oratory]] skills to expose the injustices of slavery. [[William Lloyd Garrison]], publisher of the [[abolition|abolitionist]] Liberator Newspaper, hired him.   
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He developed marvelous [[debate|debating]] and [[oration|oratory]] skills to expose the injustices of slavery by reading the book [[The Columbian Orator]],<ref>[https://books.google.com/books?id=HnAktoctDuIC&pg=PA49 Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass],p. 49, "Every opportunity I got, I used to read this book."</ref> which he started to read around age 12. [[William Lloyd Garrison]], publisher of the [[abolition]]ist Liberator Newspaper, hired him.   
  
 
Douglass published a best-selling [[autobiography]], but then felt he had to flee to [[England]] to avoid being caught by slave catchers.  Reformer Daniel O'Connell formed a friendship with him there.
 
Douglass published a best-selling [[autobiography]], but then felt he had to flee to [[England]] to avoid being caught by slave catchers.  Reformer Daniel O'Connell formed a friendship with him there.
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Douglass wrote, "I loved all mankind, slaveholder not excepted, though I abhorred slavery more than ever. I saw the world in a new light ... I gathered scattered pages of the Bible from the filthy street gutters, and washed and dried them, that ... I might get a word or two of wisdom from them."
 
Douglass wrote, "I loved all mankind, slaveholder not excepted, though I abhorred slavery more than ever. I saw the world in a new light ... I gathered scattered pages of the Bible from the filthy street gutters, and washed and dried them, that ... I might get a word or two of wisdom from them."
  
 
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==See also==
{{DEFAULTSORT:Douglass, Frederick}}
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==see also==
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* [[Abolitionism]]
 
* [[Abolitionism]]
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* [[What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?]]
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
 
<References/>
 
<References/>
  
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==External links==
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* [https://librivox.org/author/4407 Works by Frederick Douglass - text and free audio] - [[LibriVox]]
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{{DEFAULTSORT:Douglass, Frederick}}
  
 
[[Category:Abolitionists]]
 
[[Category:Abolitionists]]
 
[[Category:Slavery]]
 
[[Category:Slavery]]
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[[Category:Republicans]]
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[[Category:Patriots]]

Latest revision as of 12:40, 13 October 2016

Frederick Douglass
Freddouglas.jpg

Born February, 1818
Maryland
Died February 20, 1895
Washington D.C.
Spouse Anna Murray-Douglass

Helen Pitts Douglass

Religion Christian

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), born as Frederick Baily, was raised as a slave. He escaped to Massachusetts at age 20 and changed his name to Frederick Douglass in order to conceal himself from slave catchers. He was a member of the Republican Party.

He developed marvelous debating and oratory skills to expose the injustices of slavery by reading the book The Columbian Orator,[1] which he started to read around age 12. William Lloyd Garrison, publisher of the abolitionist Liberator Newspaper, hired him.

Douglass published a best-selling autobiography, but then felt he had to flee to England to avoid being caught by slave catchers. Reformer Daniel O'Connell formed a friendship with him there.

Upon his return to New York, he founded the "North Star" newspaper.

His motto was "Right is of no sex - Truth is of no color - God is the Father of us all, and we are all Brethren."

Douglass wrote, "I loved all mankind, slaveholder not excepted, though I abhorred slavery more than ever. I saw the world in a new light ... I gathered scattered pages of the Bible from the filthy street gutters, and washed and dried them, that ... I might get a word or two of wisdom from them."

See also

References

  1. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass,p. 49, "Every opportunity I got, I used to read this book."

External links