Difference between revisions of "Free State Project"

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The Free State Project (FSP) is a [[libertarian]] organization dedicated to promoting libertarian ideals by attempting to concentrate libertarian voters in one state, where they can influence local politics. In 2013, upon reaching 5,000 members, the Free State Project sent a mail ballot to those who signed the pledge and asked them to select a state from among the ten lowest population states.  They chose [[New Hampshire]] as the migration target because of its low taxes, strong economy, open-carry laws and generally independent and libertarian tradition, as espoused by it's motto "Live free or die."
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The Free State Project (FSP) is a [[libertarian]] organization dedicated to promoting libertarian ideals by attempting to concentrate libertarian voters in one state, where they can influence local politics. In 2013, the Free State Project chose [[New Hampshire]] as the migration target because of its low taxes, strong economy, open-carry laws and generally independent and libertarian tradition, as espoused by it's motto "Live free or die."
  
Members of the Free State Project are sometimes called porcupines, after the FSP seal. Some members have been elected to the state legislature, but so far the total number of participants is lower than was originally hoped.  On February 3, 2016, the Free State Project announced via social media that 20,000 people had signed the Statement of Intent. <ref>{{cite web|url=https://twitter.com/FreeStateNH/status/694763068010713088?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet|title=Twitter: We Did It|accessdate=March 30, 2016}}</ref> In a press conference later that day, the movement's leader said the relocation had been triggered and that signers were expected to follow up on their pledge.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://freestateproject.org/blogs/free-state-project-officially-announces-20000-signers-100-reached|title= official press conference announcing success in reaching 20,000 members|accessdate=March 30, 2016}}</ref> The organizers are now shifting their efforts from recruiting the 20,000 participants to encouraging those who have signed up to actually move to New Hampshire.  The success of the project will not be known until 2021 and will depend upon people honoring their pledge to move and the conditions created in the new New Hampshire communities.  In the meantime, the Free State Project holds an annual "Porcfest" among its members.
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Members of the Free State Project are sometimes called porcupines, after the FSP seal. Some members have been elected to the state legislature, but so far the total number of participants is lower than was originally hoped. As of December 2014, 16,332 people have signed the pledge.<ref>{{cite web|title=Membership Statistics|url=http://freestateproject.org/about/membership-statistics|publisher=Free State Project|accessdate=January 10, 2015}}</ref>
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
<references/>
 
<references/>
==External links==
 
*[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXSw0nYKiU8 "Libertopia", a full length documentary firm]
 
*[https://freestateproject.org/ Official website]
 
  
 
[[Category:Strategic Relocation]]
 
[[Category:Strategic Relocation]]
 
[[Category:Libertarianism]]
 
[[Category:Libertarianism]]
 
[[Category:New Hampshire]]
 
[[Category:New Hampshire]]

Revision as of 04:48, 1 April 2016

The Free State Project (FSP) is a libertarian organization dedicated to promoting libertarian ideals by attempting to concentrate libertarian voters in one state, where they can influence local politics. In 2013, the Free State Project chose New Hampshire as the migration target because of its low taxes, strong economy, open-carry laws and generally independent and libertarian tradition, as espoused by it's motto "Live free or die."

Members of the Free State Project are sometimes called porcupines, after the FSP seal. Some members have been elected to the state legislature, but so far the total number of participants is lower than was originally hoped. As of December 2014, 16,332 people have signed the pledge.[1]

References

  1. Membership Statistics. Free State Project. Retrieved on January 10, 2015.