Difference between revisions of "Gay Cupid"

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m (looked around for this term, only found gay dating sites... perhaps the author can includeas a reference an article or book decrying this particular hollywood trend?)
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The gay cupid has supplanted the traditional characters in classic romances, who would provide timely, sage advice, whether they be wise parents ("[[The Sound of Music]]"), a knowledgeable coach, sensible buddies ("Sabrina"), or no-nonsense girl friends ("Gentlemen Prefer Blondes").
 
The gay cupid has supplanted the traditional characters in classic romances, who would provide timely, sage advice, whether they be wise parents ("[[The Sound of Music]]"), a knowledgeable coach, sensible buddies ("Sabrina"), or no-nonsense girl friends ("Gentlemen Prefer Blondes").
  
Many consider this an example of the growing liberal bias in the media today and an example of Hollywood Values being forced upon the American public.{{who}}
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This phenomenon might be considered an example of the growing liberal bias in the media today and an example of Hollywood Values being forced upon the American public.
  
 
==Examples of gay cupids==
 
==Examples of gay cupids==

Revision as of 12:53, 9 March 2013

The "gay cupid" of many romantic comedies helps a man and a woman form a romantic relationship. Most commonly, gay cupids are one of two types:

  • a token gay, who has a brief, serendipitous role in precipitating the romance
  • a more principal character who acts as a confidant or best friend.

The gay cupid has supplanted the traditional characters in classic romances, who would provide timely, sage advice, whether they be wise parents ("The Sound of Music"), a knowledgeable coach, sensible buddies ("Sabrina"), or no-nonsense girl friends ("Gentlemen Prefer Blondes").

This phenomenon might be considered an example of the growing liberal bias in the media today and an example of Hollywood Values being forced upon the American public.

Examples of gay cupids

In "Mean Girls", a boy who is "so gay he can hardly function" gets the female lead (Lindsay Lohan) to sit near a nice boy in her math class.

In "My Best Friend's Wedding", Julia Roberts's boss flies to another city to help her get her man. In a dramatic twist, he then took the gay hero role by explaining to her why it would be ethically wrong to break up a happy couple's impending marriage.