Hugh Capet

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Hugh Capet(c.940-996), ruled 987-996, was the first of the Capetian kings of France.

He was the son of Hugh the Great (d. 956), count of Paris, he intrigued against the Carolingian king Lothair (r. 954-86) and on the death (987) of Lothair's son, Louis V, was elected king by the magnates. He then had to contend with Charles, duke of Lower Lorraine, the legitimate Carolingian claimant who had been passed over. Charles was finally imprisoned in 991. To ensure the succession, Hugh made his son Robert II (d. 1031) joint sovereign.

The Capetian kings increased their power between 987 and 1328 relative to other nobles, and weakened the feudal system.

Further reading

  • Fawtier, Robert. Capetian Kings of France (1960)