Difference between revisions of "James Monroe"

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Monroe was one of the most [[conservative]] presidents in American history, and was nearly re-elected by unanimous consent (reportedly one elector withheld his vote out of deference to the unanimous consent given to President [[George Washington]]).  Perhaps Monroe's most famous legacy is the [[Monroe Doctrine]], which instructed European powers to stop colonizing the Americas. His reason for this was conservative: the European and American systems were fundamentally different, and thus Europe should not colonize America anymore or even interfere in our Hemisphere. To this day presidents continue to cite the Monroe Doctrine whenever a European country tries to do something over here.  
 
Monroe was one of the most [[conservative]] presidents in American history, and was nearly re-elected by unanimous consent (reportedly one elector withheld his vote out of deference to the unanimous consent given to President [[George Washington]]).  Perhaps Monroe's most famous legacy is the [[Monroe Doctrine]], which instructed European powers to stop colonizing the Americas. His reason for this was conservative: the European and American systems were fundamentally different, and thus Europe should not colonize America anymore or even interfere in our Hemisphere. To this day presidents continue to cite the Monroe Doctrine whenever a European country tries to do something over here.  
  
The "[[Era of Good Feelings]]" overtook our country under Monroe's conservative leadership. The economy prospered. He vetoed the Cumberland Road Bill and the House rejected most spending bills on internal projects. The U.S. Senate was split evenly: 11 free states and 11 slave states (Delaware and Kentucky were slave states). Monroe peacefully resolved the difficult dispute over slavery in new states with the Missouri Compromise: admit one free state (Maine) to balance one new slave state (Missouri), and ban abortion above a certain latitude (36 degrees, 30 minutes) in the new Louisiana Territory.  
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The "[[Era of Good Feelings]]" overtook our country under Monroe's conservative leadership. The economy prospered. He vetoed the Cumberland Road Bill and the House rejected most spending bills on internal projects. The U.S. Senate was split evenly: 11 free states and 11 slave states (Delaware and Kentucky were slave states). Monroe peacefully resolved the difficult dispute over slavery in new states with the Missouri Compromise: admit one free state (Maine) to balance one new slave state (Missouri), and ban abolition above a certain latitude (36 degrees, 30 minutes) in the new Louisiana Territory.  
  
 
Monroe's presidency also oversaw Spain ceding [[Florida]] to the United States. <ref>http://www.ipl.org/div/potus/jmonroe.html</ref>
 
Monroe's presidency also oversaw Spain ceding [[Florida]] to the United States. <ref>http://www.ipl.org/div/potus/jmonroe.html</ref>

Revision as of 10:08, 28 April 2007

James monroe.jpg
James Monroe;

Fifth President of the United States

Born April 28, 1758
Died July 4, 1831
Term 1817-1825

James Monroe was the 5th president of the United States. He was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia on April 28, 1758. He served two terms as president from 1817-1825.

Monroe was one of the most conservative presidents in American history, and was nearly re-elected by unanimous consent (reportedly one elector withheld his vote out of deference to the unanimous consent given to President George Washington). Perhaps Monroe's most famous legacy is the Monroe Doctrine, which instructed European powers to stop colonizing the Americas. His reason for this was conservative: the European and American systems were fundamentally different, and thus Europe should not colonize America anymore or even interfere in our Hemisphere. To this day presidents continue to cite the Monroe Doctrine whenever a European country tries to do something over here.

The "Era of Good Feelings" overtook our country under Monroe's conservative leadership. The economy prospered. He vetoed the Cumberland Road Bill and the House rejected most spending bills on internal projects. The U.S. Senate was split evenly: 11 free states and 11 slave states (Delaware and Kentucky were slave states). Monroe peacefully resolved the difficult dispute over slavery in new states with the Missouri Compromise: admit one free state (Maine) to balance one new slave state (Missouri), and ban abolition above a certain latitude (36 degrees, 30 minutes) in the new Louisiana Territory.

Monroe's presidency also oversaw Spain ceding Florida to the United States. [1]

Background

Monroe had served in the American Revolution, and led the charge at the Battle of Trenton. He was hit by a musket ball in his shoulder, striking an artery. After he recovered, he continued to fight for the Patriots.[2]

As an anti-Federalist, he opposed ratification of the U.S. Constitution in the absence of a Bill of Rights.

He served as Senator and also Governor of Virginia. He was the Secretary of State in the Administration of Thomas Jefferson, where Monroe negotiated the Louisiana Purchase.

Monroe was Secretary of War under president James Madison during the war of 1812.

In His Own Words

When elected President, James Monroe declared in his Inaugural Address, March 4, 1817:

I enter on the trust to which I have been called by the suffrages of my fellow-citizens with my fervent prayers to the Almighty that He will be graciously pleased to continue to us that protection which He has already so conspicuously displayed.

President Monroe declared in his First Annual Message to Congress in 1817:

For advantages so numerous and highly important it is our duty to unite in grateful acknowledgments to that Omnipotent Being from whom they are derived, and in unceasing prayer that He will endow us with virtue and strength to maintain and hand them down in their utmost purity to our latest posterity.

Monroe died on July 4, 1831 in New York City.

References

  1. http://www.ipl.org/div/potus/jmonroe.html
  2. http://www.amerisearch.net/index.php?date=2004-04-28&view=View