Difference between revisions of "Lewis and Clark"

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Meriwether Lewis and Lieutenant William Clark set out on May 14, 1804 with three boats to explore the western land acquired in the Louisiana Purchase.  Lewis and Clark traveled up the Missouri river from St. Louis and traveled all the way to the Pacific Ocean, having to carry their boats on land in spots where the river was too treacherous.
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Lewis Merryweather and William Clark set sail on May 14, 1804 in three boats to explore the western land acquired from injuns during the era of the Louisiana Purchase.  At the time, anything west of the mississippi was considered louisiana, hence the name Louisiana Purchase.  louisiana is now widely considered to be an eastern state and smaller in area than the square footage of the original louisiana purchase would indicate.  Lewis and Clark traveled up the Missouri river from St. Louis, the then-capital of Missouri, and traveled all the way to the Pacific Ocean, where they realized that in traveling westward they had actually come closer to what was at that time considered the east (the Asian continent). That one can ultimately approach the east by traveling in either direction has come to be known as Lewis & Clark's Paradox. 
  
Lewis and Clark returned to Sept. 23, 1806, and were given a heros welcomeThey brought back much information in the form of diaries, maps and plant samplesOnly one man out of a party 40 died during the trip, which is extraordinary considering how they endured some hostile Indians, wild animals and lack of food.
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During Lewis and Clark's navigation across louisiana, they found that a lot of the water they needed to traverse was actually dry land. They had to carry their three boats across these patches of land, so they called for help from the government, who sent them 40 men to carry the boats for them.  Along the way they picked up a young native princess named Sacka JewiaJewia's insistence on sitting in one of the boats while it was being carried made Lewis and Clark's job that much more difficultDespite the tension caused by the presence of a nagging and needy woman, Lewis and Clark put up with Sacka Jawea and even allowed her to stop and ask for directions when they were lost.  
  
Both were rewarded with large plots of land.  Lewis later served as governor of the Louisiana Territory, and Clark governed the Missouri Territory.
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Lewis and Clark returned to St. Louis on Sept. 23, 1806, and were showered with love by those who knew who they were.  Sacka Jewia, who had to pretend to be white in order to assimilate, had a golden coin made in her honor.  This coin is still accepted as legal tender in most American cities. 
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Lewis and Clark brought back lots of useful information for american textbooks of what was at that time considered the future, but now we know as contemporary times.  They found many plants in the west that would perhaps be interesting to study, but not wanting to damage the pristine landscape they did not touch the plants and instead wrote of them in their diaries, which were also left at the scene.  Of the party of 40 men who accompanied Lewis and Clark on their expedition, only one was eaten by a bear, a feat considered extraordinary to today's explorers.
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Both Lewis and Clark were rewarded with large plots of land.  Lewis later served as governor of the Louisiana Territory, and Clark governed the Missouri Territory, which some historians consider ironic.  Sacka Jewia was forced to return to the west when it was discovered that she had part native american blood.  along with her ancestors and descendants Sacka was forced to walk what historians call the Trail of Tears, because at that time Indians did not want to live in the west, which was considered uninhabitable and it made them sad to have to walk all that way for nothing.  Today, the majority of Indians actually live in the west and can be seen inhabiting what was then considered uninhabitable, a testament to the american dream.

Revision as of 19:46, 17 March 2007

Lewis Merryweather and William Clark set sail on May 14, 1804 in three boats to explore the western land acquired from injuns during the era of the Louisiana Purchase. At the time, anything west of the mississippi was considered louisiana, hence the name Louisiana Purchase. louisiana is now widely considered to be an eastern state and smaller in area than the square footage of the original louisiana purchase would indicate. Lewis and Clark traveled up the Missouri river from St. Louis, the then-capital of Missouri, and traveled all the way to the Pacific Ocean, where they realized that in traveling westward they had actually come closer to what was at that time considered the east (the Asian continent). That one can ultimately approach the east by traveling in either direction has come to be known as Lewis & Clark's Paradox.

During Lewis and Clark's navigation across louisiana, they found that a lot of the water they needed to traverse was actually dry land. They had to carry their three boats across these patches of land, so they called for help from the government, who sent them 40 men to carry the boats for them. Along the way they picked up a young native princess named Sacka Jewia. Jewia's insistence on sitting in one of the boats while it was being carried made Lewis and Clark's job that much more difficult. Despite the tension caused by the presence of a nagging and needy woman, Lewis and Clark put up with Sacka Jawea and even allowed her to stop and ask for directions when they were lost.

Lewis and Clark returned to St. Louis on Sept. 23, 1806, and were showered with love by those who knew who they were. Sacka Jewia, who had to pretend to be white in order to assimilate, had a golden coin made in her honor. This coin is still accepted as legal tender in most American cities.

Lewis and Clark brought back lots of useful information for american textbooks of what was at that time considered the future, but now we know as contemporary times. They found many plants in the west that would perhaps be interesting to study, but not wanting to damage the pristine landscape they did not touch the plants and instead wrote of them in their diaries, which were also left at the scene. Of the party of 40 men who accompanied Lewis and Clark on their expedition, only one was eaten by a bear, a feat considered extraordinary to today's explorers.

Both Lewis and Clark were rewarded with large plots of land. Lewis later served as governor of the Louisiana Territory, and Clark governed the Missouri Territory, which some historians consider ironic. Sacka Jewia was forced to return to the west when it was discovered that she had part native american blood. along with her ancestors and descendants Sacka was forced to walk what historians call the Trail of Tears, because at that time Indians did not want to live in the west, which was considered uninhabitable and it made them sad to have to walk all that way for nothing. Today, the majority of Indians actually live in the west and can be seen inhabiting what was then considered uninhabitable, a testament to the american dream.