Difference between revisions of "Magic (card game)"

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'''Magic: The Gathering''' is a [[strategy card game]] which lets players take the role of a dueling [[wizard (fictional)|wizard]]s who can summon creatures to fight for them.  You defeat your opponent by reducing his [[life point]]s down to zero or by being the last one with cards remaining in his draw pile.
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'''Magic: The Gathering''' is a [[strategy card game]] which lets players take the role of dueling [[Wizard_(fiction)|wizards]] who can summon creatures to fight for them.  One defeats his opponent by reducing his [[life point]]s down to zero or by being the last one with cards remaining in his draw pile.
  
 
The game consists of numerous elements from various fantasy worlds, including magic, [[elf|elves]], [[dwarf (mythology)|dwarves]], [[dragon]]s, mana, [[orc]]s, and so forth.  One of the reasons for keeping the game limited to the size of a small deck of cards was so that it could be easily taken along to, and played at, gaming conventions.<ref>''The Coming CCG Storm: 1993-1995''  "A Brief History of Game" (2006) [http://www.rpg.net/columns/briefhistory/briefhistory1.phtml RPGnet] Accessed 31 December 2007.</ref>
 
The game consists of numerous elements from various fantasy worlds, including magic, [[elf|elves]], [[dwarf (mythology)|dwarves]], [[dragon]]s, mana, [[orc]]s, and so forth.  One of the reasons for keeping the game limited to the size of a small deck of cards was so that it could be easily taken along to, and played at, gaming conventions.<ref>''The Coming CCG Storm: 1993-1995''  "A Brief History of Game" (2006) [http://www.rpg.net/columns/briefhistory/briefhistory1.phtml RPGnet] Accessed 31 December 2007.</ref>

Revision as of 13:00, 9 September 2008

Magic: The Gathering is a strategy card game which lets players take the role of dueling wizards who can summon creatures to fight for them. One defeats his opponent by reducing his life points down to zero or by being the last one with cards remaining in his draw pile.

The game consists of numerous elements from various fantasy worlds, including magic, elves, dwarves, dragons, mana, orcs, and so forth. One of the reasons for keeping the game limited to the size of a small deck of cards was so that it could be easily taken along to, and played at, gaming conventions.[1]

Its creator is Richard Garfield and the game is owned by Wizards of the Coast, the same firm that publishes Dungeons and Dragons. The full name of the game uses a subtitle, i.e., Magic: The Gathering.

Colors

Magic cards come in five colors, representing the different aspects of magic: red (destruction, fire and mountains), blue (deceit, water, islands), white (Order, yet sometimes confused for good; light, plains), green (nature and animals), and black (evil, death, decay, swamps). Additionally, there are colorless cards (artifacts) which are associated with no color and multicolored cards which are associated with two or more colors of magic.

Some cards represent creatures, which are summoned to attack and defend. Other spells can be used to attack other players, bolster ones own creatures, and a multitude of other effects.

Criticism

The card game very quickly came under scrutiny for its inclusion of dark magic elements, such as demons. It was only after strong criticism from concerned families that these elements were scaled back. However, in recent years demons have been returning to Magic[2].

Pastor David Brown has identified four key problems with the game:[3] 1) The primary focus on the occult 2) The violent nature of the game 3) The addictive nature of the game 4) The identification of the players with evil characters.

Additionally, some cards feature scandalous depictions of female characters, since the artwork style guide aims to appeal to adolescent males. ("Remember, your audience is BOYS 14 and up")[4]

References

  1. The Coming CCG Storm: 1993-1995 "A Brief History of Game" (2006) RPGnet Accessed 31 December 2007.
  2. http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=mtgcom/daily/mr131
  3. http://logosresourcepages.org/Occult/magic-g.htm
  4. http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=mtgcom/daily/mc3

External links