Difference between revisions of "Mallard Fillmore"

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(Remove cheap shot. Reword sentence to make it clear that Tinsley was in fact talking about academic success.)
(Just because it's referenced doesn't mean it's necessary. Removed for conciseness. Also, added commas around "in fact".)
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'''Mallard Fillmore''' is a newspaper comic strip with a conservative point of view, by cartoonist Bruce Tinsley. It appears in about four hundred U. S. newspapers. The title character is in fact a mallard duck. It first appeared in the Charlottesville, Va ''Daily Progress,'' but was dropped when Tinsley refused to tone down its conservative politics; it was subsequently picked up by ''The [[Washington Times]].''<ref>[http://www.kingfeatures.com/features/comics/mallard/aboutMaina.php Mallard Fillmore], King Features Syndicate site.</ref>
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'''Mallard Fillmore''' is a newspaper comic strip with a conservative point of view, by cartoonist Bruce Tinsley. It appears in about four hundred U. S. newspapers. The title character is, in fact, a mallard duck. It first appeared in the Charlottesville, Va ''Daily Progress,'' but was dropped when Tinsley refused to tone down its conservative politics; it was subsequently picked up by ''The [[Washington Times]].''<ref>[http://www.kingfeatures.com/features/comics/mallard/aboutMaina.php Mallard Fillmore], King Features Syndicate site.</ref>
 
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During the week of June 10, 2002 the strip dealt with the academic success of home-schooled students.<ref>[http://jewishworldreview.com/strips/mallard/2000/mallard061002.asp Mallard Fillmore, 06/10/2002]</ref>
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==Controversies==
 
==Controversies==

Revision as of 17:50, 2 May 2007

Mallard Fillmore is a newspaper comic strip with a conservative point of view, by cartoonist Bruce Tinsley. It appears in about four hundred U. S. newspapers. The title character is, in fact, a mallard duck. It first appeared in the Charlottesville, Va Daily Progress, but was dropped when Tinsley refused to tone down its conservative politics; it was subsequently picked up by The Washington Times.[1]

Controversies

The January 4, 2005 cartoon carried a picture of a television executive, which some readers felt was a Jewish caricature.[2]

References

  1. Mallard Fillmore, King Features Syndicate site.
  2. Jewish World review http://jewishworldreview.com/strips/mallard/2000/MFT50104.jpg

See also