Difference between revisions of "Meritocracy"

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A '''meritocracy''' (from Latin ''mereō'', "to earn, and Ancient Greek κράτος, "strength, power") is a political or administrative system in which promotions are based on merit, rather than on friendship, seniority, [[quota]]s, [[liberal]] politics, or mob rule. The nature of "merit" is not easy to define, but it can be said to include natural ability, past experience, education, morality and overall suitability for the position. This question has, however, often been the object of debate, especially for what concerns the importance which is to be given to academic qualifications.
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A '''meritocracy''' (from Latin ''mereō'', "to earn," and Ancient Greek κράτος, "strength, power") is a political or administrative system in which promotions are based on merit, rather than on friendship, seniority, [[quota]]s, [[liberal]] politics, or mob rule. The nature of "merit" is not easy to define, but it can be said to include natural ability, past experience, education, morality and overall suitability for the position. This question has, however, often been the object of debate, especially for what concerns the importance which is to be given to academic qualifications.
  
 
[[Category:Dictionary]]
 
[[Category:Dictionary]]
 
[[Category:political Terms]]
 
[[Category:political Terms]]

Latest revision as of 20:37, 12 November 2012

A meritocracy (from Latin mereō, "to earn," and Ancient Greek κράτος, "strength, power") is a political or administrative system in which promotions are based on merit, rather than on friendship, seniority, quotas, liberal politics, or mob rule. The nature of "merit" is not easy to define, but it can be said to include natural ability, past experience, education, morality and overall suitability for the position. This question has, however, often been the object of debate, especially for what concerns the importance which is to be given to academic qualifications.