Difference between revisions of "Muammar al-Gaddafi"

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[[File:Muammar Abu Minyar al-Gaddafi in Dimashq.jpg|thumb|right|200px|"Leader and Guide of the 1969 Revolution."]]
 
[[File:Muammar Abu Minyar al-Gaddafi in Dimashq.jpg|thumb|right|200px|"Leader and Guide of the 1969 Revolution."]]
Colonel '''Muammar Abu Minyar al-Gaddafi''' ([[Arabic language|Arabic]]: معمر القذافي, b. 1942 - d. October 20, 2011) was the Head of State of [[Libya]], a [[socialist]] and [[leader]] until the 2011 Libyan civil war. He rose to power through a coup that he led in 1969, and he ruled Libya for more than forty years ending with his capture and death. Once he became the leader of Libya, he renamed all the months in the calendar and published the Green Book, which was a series of pamphlets on democracy, economics, and sociology.   
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Colonel '''Muammar Abu Minyar al-Gaddafi''' ([[Arabic language|Arabic]]: معمر القذافي, b. 1942 - d. October 20, 2011) was the Head of State of [[Libya]], a [[socialist]] and [[dictator]] until the 2011 Libyan civil war. He rose to power through a coup that he led in 1969, and he ruled Libya for more than forty years ending with his capture and death. Once he became the leader of Libya, he renamed all the months in the calendar and published the Green Book, which was a series of pamphlets on democracy, economics, and sociology.   
  
 
==Rise to power==
 
==Rise to power==

Revision as of 16:51, 5 December 2012

"Leader and Guide of the 1969 Revolution."

Colonel Muammar Abu Minyar al-Gaddafi (Arabic: معمر القذافي, b. 1942 - d. October 20, 2011) was the Head of State of Libya, a socialist and dictator until the 2011 Libyan civil war. He rose to power through a coup that he led in 1969, and he ruled Libya for more than forty years ending with his capture and death. Once he became the leader of Libya, he renamed all the months in the calendar and published the Green Book, which was a series of pamphlets on democracy, economics, and sociology.

Rise to power

In the 1970s, Gaddafi attempted to assume the leadership of a pan-Arabic movement, a position left open by the death of President Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt; however, other Arab nations mostly ignored him. He attempted to extend his influence in Africa by supporting Uganda's Idi Amin in the Uganda-Tanzania War with military aid and equipment, including Tu-22 jet bombers. In the 1980s, Gaddafi became a sponsor of terrorism and President Ronald Reagan ordered a retaliatory bombing of his palace and key Libyan targets (Operation El Dorado Canyon). (In August 2003, Libya agreed to pay $2.7 billion to families of the 270 killed on board flight 103, when it blew up in December 1988 over Lockerbie, Scotland. Just six months after the settlement, Qaddafi was visited by British Prime Minister Tony Blair in Tripoli.) [1]

Renounces terrorism and restoration to the international community

In the 1990s, Gaddafi changed course and severed all ties with terrorism to normalize relations with the West. In 2006, the "decision of the US to restore full diplomatic relations with Libya marks the crowning success of his efforts to have his country accepted back into the international community." [2] Condoleezza Rice praised Libya for its "excellent co-operation" in the US-led war on terror. [3] Full diplomatic relations with the United States were restored in 2006, and the Gaddafi regime's turnaround has been heralded by Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice as a model for others to follow.

Relations with Israel and Palestinians

Gaddafi was a lifelong enemy of Israel and under his reign Israel was not recognized by Libya. He also expelled Palestinian Arabs from Libya.[4]

Nobel Peace Prize winner Nelson Mandela greets an old friend and ally, Muammar Gaddafi.

Brother in arms with Nelson Mandela

Nobel Peace Prize recipient Nelson Mandela speaking of the values he shares with Gaddafi, said,

In a world where the strong may seek to impose upon the more vulnerable; and where particular nations or groups of nations may still seek to decide the fate of the planet - in such a world respect for multilateralism, moderation of public discourse and a patient search for compromise become even more imperative to save the world from debilitating conflict and enduring inequality. When we dismissed criticism of our friendship with yourself, My Brother Leader, and of the relationship between South Africa and Libya, it was precisely in defence of those values.[5]


Domestic affairs

Schoolboys chant pro-Gaddafi slogans, Photograph: Reuters.

The Libyan people thrived under his leadership. A delegation of medical professionals from Russia, Ukraine and Belarus wrote in an appeal "Russian President Medvedev and Prime Minister Putin that after becoming acquainted with Libyan life, it was their view that in few nations did people live in such comfort".

"China is a different kind of competitor. It is a rising economic power and America is unable to stop it. It has an unprecedented human wealth. In addition, it is a nuclear-weapon state and a permanent member of the Security Council. Everywhere in the world, China is making economic, human and political inroads. Unlike America which unwisely has chosen the harsh military approach, China is making those inroads using soft power. America continues its brazen interference in the internal affairs of states in the name of democracy and human rights. Africom is a case in point. Such interference is no longer acceptable. America itself is condemned in the field of human rights. It makes a habit of taking losers as allies... America is aware of the danger China poses. China..America..The inevitable Confrontation."

Capture and murder

Gadafi was brutally murdered by NATO-armed and -equipped jihadi rebels during President Obama's "humanitarian intervention" in the Libyan War of 2011.[6]

External links

References

  1. Muammar Qaddafi.
  2. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3336059.stm
  3. [1] (BBC News).
  4. http://www.nytimes.com/1995/10/05/world/libya-s-leader-urges-other-arab-countries-to-expel-palestinians.html
  5. http://www.politicsweb.co.za/politicsweb/view/politicsweb/en/page71656?oid=222537&sn=Detail
  6. http://socioecohistory.wordpress.com/2011/11/01/corbett-gaddafi-murder-shows-hypocrisy-of-nato-humanitarian-intervention/