Difference between revisions of "National debt of the United States"

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(Debt of the US: 2008 has not happened yet)
(Debt to GDP Ratio: more recent data)
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==Debt to GDP Ratio==
 
==Debt to GDP Ratio==
Instead of measuring an absolute number, the Debt to GDP ratio is the measurement of the national debt as a percentage of the gross domestic product.   It is a measure of the debt in relation to the economy and of our capacity to carry and repay debt.  The US Debt to GDP ''ratio'' is getting smaller, as the US economy is growing faster than the debt.  This has not always been the case. <ref>http://www.optimist123.com/optimist/</ref>
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Instead of measuring an absolute number, the Debt to GDP ratio is the measurement of the national debt as a percentage of the gross domestic product. It is a measure of the debt in relation to the economy and of our capacity to carry and repay debt.<ref>[http://www.optimist123.com/optimist/2005/01/national_debt_b.html National Debt burden: Full history] 29-Jan-05 </ref> The US Debt to GDP ''ratio'' is getting larger, as the US economy's debt is growing faster than the GDP.<ref>Steve McGourty [http://www.cedarcomm.com/~stevelm1/usdebt.htm United States National Debt (1938 to Present)]May 6, 2007 </ref> This has not always been the case.
 
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==References==
 
==References==

Revision as of 17:38, 1 September 2007

The National Debt is the amount of money the United States government owes various creditors due to deficit spending. The current national debt is approximately 9 trillion dollars. [1]

Debt of the US

In January 20, 1993; the same year of Clinton's inauguration into office, the national debt of the United States was 4.1 trillion dollars and by the end of his run in office (January 19, 2001) it was at 5.7 trillion dollars. [2] By August 8, 2007; the debt has grown to 8.9 trillion dollars.[3]

Debt to GDP Ratio

Instead of measuring an absolute number, the Debt to GDP ratio is the measurement of the national debt as a percentage of the gross domestic product. It is a measure of the debt in relation to the economy and of our capacity to carry and repay debt.[4] The US Debt to GDP ratio is getting larger, as the US economy's debt is growing faster than the GDP.[5] This has not always been the case.

References

  1. http://www.treasurydirect.gov/NP/BPDLogin?application=np
  2. http://www.treasurydirect.gov/NP/NPGateway
  3. http://www.treasurydirect.gov/NP/NPGateway
  4. National Debt burden: Full history 29-Jan-05
  5. Steve McGourty United States National Debt (1938 to Present)May 6, 2007

Further reading