Difference between revisions of "Norman J. Clayton"

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'''Norman J. Clayton''' (January 22, 1903 – June 1, 1992) was a [[gospel]] hymn writer best known for his 1942 composition, "Now I belong to Jesus."
 
'''Norman J. Clayton''' (January 22, 1903 – June 1, 1992) was a [[gospel]] hymn writer best known for his 1942 composition, "Now I belong to Jesus."
  
Clayton was the ninth of ten children born in [[Brooklyn]], [[New York City]]. He surrendered his life to [[Jesus Christ]] at the age of six at the South Brooklyn Gospel Church, where hias mother had been a foundation member. At the age of twelve he undertook what became a lifelong assignment as organist at his church.<ref name=hymnary>{{cite web|url=https://hymnary.org/text/once_my_heart_was_troubled_with_its_sin|title=Norman J. Clayton|publisher=Hymnary.org|accessdate=March 26, 2018}}</ref>
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Clayton was the ninth of ten children born in [[Brooklyn]], [[New York City]]. He surrendered his life to [[Jesus Christ]] at the age of six at the South Brooklyn Gospel Church, where his mother had been a foundation member. At the age of twelve he undertook what became a lifelong assignment as organist at his church.<ref name=hymnary>{{cite web|url=https://hymnary.org/text/once_my_heart_was_troubled_with_its_sin|title=Norman J. Clayton|publisher=Hymnary.org|accessdate=March 26, 2018}}</ref>
  
 
Clayton was first employed in the construction business but established a music company, Gospel Songs, later absorbed by the Rodeheaver Company. In 1942, he began working with  Jack Wyrtzen’s Word of Life organization, which offered gospel music to radio and crusade meetings. Clayton wrote scores of gospel songs, none as popular as "Now I Belong to Jesus." Another Clayton composition is “Every Moment of Every Day”.<ref name=hymnary/>
 
Clayton was first employed in the construction business but established a music company, Gospel Songs, later absorbed by the Rodeheaver Company. In 1942, he began working with  Jack Wyrtzen’s Word of Life organization, which offered gospel music to radio and crusade meetings. Clayton wrote scores of gospel songs, none as popular as "Now I Belong to Jesus." Another Clayton composition is “Every Moment of Every Day”.<ref name=hymnary/>

Latest revision as of 21:12, 10 June 2018

Norman J. Clayton

(Composer of Christian hymn, "Now I belong to Jesus")


Born January 22, 1903
Brooklyn, New York City
Died June 1, 1992 (aged 89)
Carmel, Putnam County
New York
Religion Gospel Church

Norman J. Clayton (January 22, 1903 – June 1, 1992) was a gospel hymn writer best known for his 1942 composition, "Now I belong to Jesus."

Clayton was the ninth of ten children born in Brooklyn, New York City. He surrendered his life to Jesus Christ at the age of six at the South Brooklyn Gospel Church, where his mother had been a foundation member. At the age of twelve he undertook what became a lifelong assignment as organist at his church.[1]

Clayton was first employed in the construction business but established a music company, Gospel Songs, later absorbed by the Rodeheaver Company. In 1942, he began working with Jack Wyrtzen’s Word of Life organization, which offered gospel music to radio and crusade meetings. Clayton wrote scores of gospel songs, none as popular as "Now I Belong to Jesus." Another Clayton composition is “Every Moment of Every Day”.[1]

Clayton once said that he usually wrote the music to a song before the words and made sure each selection was biblically-based. To help in his compositions, Clayton made it his practice "to memorise scripture, so his songs would have a strong Biblical basis. He also found it easier in his composition of he first memorized many passages of Scripture. His work is said to be "sweet and tender of sentiment ... and reflect his evangelical emphasis."[1] He focused on salvation through Christ and the sweet relationship with God through Jesus.

When Clayton died in 1992 at the age of eighty-nine, he had been residing in Carmel in Putnam County, whis is included in the northern portion of the New York metropolitan area.[2] By the time of his passing, the more liberal churches had moved away from old gospel songs to more upbeat music and choruses, some with charismatic themes.[1]


References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Norman J. Clayton. Hymnary.org. Retrieved on March 26, 2018.
  2. Norman J. Clayton (1903-1992). Ancientfaces.com. Retrieved on March 26, 2018.