Difference between revisions of "Quechua"

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(removed inaccurate statement (Basque, isolating?); also, this article needs refs)
(So I told myself, "Hey, let's find some sources for Quechua - how hard can it be?"... I'll be more careful with such questions next time.)
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'''Quechua''' is a [[Native American]] language of [[South America]], and was the language spoken by the [[Inca]]s. Today it still survives in areas that were inhabited by the Incas, including [[Peru]], [[Bolivia]], [[Ecuador]], and [[Colombia]]
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'''Quechua''' is a [[Native American]] language of [[South America]]. It was spoken by the [[Inca]]s<ref>[http://www.quechua.org.uk/Eng/Main/i_INTRO.HTM#HistoryUpToConquest Introduction to the Indigenous Languages of Latin America] (Origins:  History up to the European Conquest)</ref> and still survives in areas that were inhabited by the Incas, including [[Peru]], [[Bolivia]], [[Ecuador]], and [[Colombia]]. However, it should be noted that the language predates the Incas by centuries.<ref>[http://www.quechua.org.uk/Eng/Main/i_MYTHS.HTM#DidQuechuaComeFromTheIncas Popular (and damaging) Myths about Quechua] (Did Quechua Come from the Incas?)</ref>
  
The grammar of Quechua is mainly isolating, making it typologically similar to [[Chinese]]. The exception is for mood and aspect, which are typically marked by adjectival inflection. The language also includes question particles, which is a significant anomaly, especially in languages of this type.
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An interesting aspect of Quechua is that it uses a three-vowel system, omitting "e" and "o".<ref>[http://www.zompist.com/quechua.html A few words on Quechua]</ref> The grammar is mainly isolating, making it typologically similar to [[Chinese]]. The exception is for mood and aspect, which are typically marked by adjectival inflection.<ref>[http://www.zompist.com/kitgram.html The Language Construction Kit] - "Is your language inflecting, agglutinating, or isolating?"</ref> The language also includes question particles.<ref>[http://www.zompist.com/kitgram.html The Language Construction Kit] - "How do you form yes-no questions?"</ref>
  
Phonologically, Quechua has a typical two-vowel system. The consonants are distinguished by the presence of a fuller set of labial sounds than coronals and velars combined. Because the language is syntactically isolating, there are no important prosodic or intonational phenomena.
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==References==
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Revision as of 16:34, 30 December 2007

Quechua is a Native American language of South America. It was spoken by the Incas[1] and still survives in areas that were inhabited by the Incas, including Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Colombia. However, it should be noted that the language predates the Incas by centuries.[2]

An interesting aspect of Quechua is that it uses a three-vowel system, omitting "e" and "o".[3] The grammar is mainly isolating, making it typologically similar to Chinese. The exception is for mood and aspect, which are typically marked by adjectival inflection.[4] The language also includes question particles.[5]

References

  1. Introduction to the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (Origins: History up to the European Conquest)
  2. Popular (and damaging) Myths about Quechua (Did Quechua Come from the Incas?)
  3. A few words on Quechua
  4. The Language Construction Kit - "Is your language inflecting, agglutinating, or isolating?"
  5. The Language Construction Kit - "How do you form yes-no questions?"