Difference between revisions of "Rational number"

From Conservapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
m (New page: A rational number is a quotient of the form <math>\frac{a}{b}</math> where ''a'', ''b'' are integers and ''b'' ≠ 0. Category: Mathematics)
 
m
Line 1: Line 1:
A rational number is a quotient of the form <math>\frac{a}{b}</math> where ''a'', ''b'' are [[integer]]s and ''b'' &ne; 0.
+
A rational number is a quotient of the form <math>\frac{a}{b}</math> where ''a'', ''b'' are [[integer]]s and ''b'' &ne; 0. The set of rational numbers, usually denoted by <math>\mathbb{Q}</math> is an example of a [[totally disconnected set]] that is not [[locally compact]].
 
+
 
[[Category: Mathematics]]
 
[[Category: Mathematics]]

Revision as of 17:16, 3 April 2007

A rational number is a quotient of the form where a, b are integers and b ≠ 0. The set of rational numbers, usually denoted by is an example of a totally disconnected set that is not locally compact.