Difference between revisions of "Revised English Bible"

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{{Bible translation infobox | translation_title=Revised English Bible
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The '''Revised English Bible''' is a 1989 revision of the [[New English Bible]], which was at the time of its publication (1970 for the complete Bible, 1961 for the [[New Testament]]) a popular Bible translation in [[England]]. The major differences between the Revised English Bible and the New English Bible are:  The Revised English Bible uses "gender-neutral" language, while the New English Bible does not; and the Revised English Bible changed some idiosyncratic translations used in the NEB to the more common usage.
| full_name=Revised English Bible
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| image=[[Image:Reb-cover.jpg|180px|The Revised English Bible|thumb|center]]
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| derived_from=[[New English Bible]]
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| abbreviation=REB
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| complete_bible_published=1989
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| textual_basis = '''NT:''' Medium correspondence to Nestle-Aland [[Novum Testamentum Graece]] 27th edition, with occasional parallels to [[Codex Bezae]]. '''OT:''' [[Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia]] (1967/77) with [[Dead Sea Scrolls]] and [[Septuagint]] influence. '''Apocrypha:''' [[Septuagint]] with [[Vulgate]] influence.
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| translation_type = [[Dynamic equivalence]].
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| reading_level = High School
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| copyright= © [[Oxford University Press]] and [[Cambridge University Press]] 1989
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| religious_affiliation=Ecumenical
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| genesis_1:1-3=In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. The earth was a vast waste, darkness covered the deep, and the spirit of God hovered over the surface of the water. God said, 'Let there be light,' and there was light;
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| john_3:16=God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that everyone who has faith in him may not perish but have eternal life.
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|}}
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{{BibleHistory}}
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{{Bible Versions}}
The '''Revised English Bible (REB)''' is a 1989 update of the [[New English Bible]] of 1970.  Like its predecessor, it is published by the University publishing houses of [[Oxford University|Oxford]] and [[University of Cambridge|Cambridge]].
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==Sponsors==
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The churches and other Christian groups that sponsored the REB were:
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*[[Baptist Union of Great Britain]]
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*[[Church of England]]
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*[[Church of Scotland]]
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*[[Council of Churches for Wales]]
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*[[Irish Council of Churches]]
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*The London Yearly Meeting of the [[Religious Society of Friends]]
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*[[Methodist Church]] of Great Britain
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*[[Moravian Church]] in Great Britain and Ireland
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*[[Roman Catholic Church]] in England and Wales
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*Roman Catholic Church in Ireland
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*Roman Catholic Church in Scotland
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*[[Salvation Army]]
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*[[United Reformed Church]]
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*[[British and Foreign Bible Society|Bible Society]]
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*[[National Bible Society of Scotland]]
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==Translation philosophy==
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The REB is the result of both advances in scholarship and translation made since the 1960s and also a desire to correct what have been seen as some of the NEB's more egregious errors. For examples of changes, see the references. The changes remove many of the most idiosyncratic renderings of the [[New English Bible]], moving the REB more in the direction of standard translations such as [[NRSV]] or [[NIV]].
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The translation is intended to be gender-inclusive, to the extent that this is justified by the original language, though it does not take this to the same extent as the [[NRSV]] or [[TNIV]]. The gender-inclusive approach has also been widely praised by others as a needful corrective to centuries of church-inspired paternalism. Nevertheless, it can be criticized by those who think this approach to be a bow to [[political correctness]] and [[feminist theology]].
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The style has been described by several people as more "literary" than [[NRSV]] or [[NIV]]. It tends slightly further in the direction of "dynamic equivalence" than those translations, but still translates Hebrew poetry as poetry and reflects at least some of the characteristics of that poetry. The Revised English Bible's general accuracy and literary flavour has led [[Stephen Mitchell]] and others[http://homepage.mac.com/rmansfield/thislamp/files/071806_revised_english_bible.html] to compliment it as one of the best English renderings.
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These days there are few differences between evangelical and non-evangelical translations. The best-known difference is probably Isaiah 7:14, where evangelical translators often have "virgin" instead of "young woman". The REB is a non-evangelical translation.
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Like the NEB, it is primarily presented to the British and British-educated public, although it has some [[United States|American]] users and admirers.
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==References==
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*[http://homepage.mac.com/rmansfield/thislamp/files/071806_revised_english_bible.html The Revised English Bible (Top Ten Bible Versions #6)] Rick Mansfield
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*[http://www.bible-researcher.com/reb.html The Revised English Bible (1989)] Michael Marlowe
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*[http://englishbibles.blogspot.com/2005/04/reb-revised-english-bible.html Better Bibles Blog] Wayne Leman, plus comments
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*review of The Revised English Bible with Apocrypha by Roger Coleman, in Novum Testamentum, Vol. 33, Fasc. 2 (Apr., 1991), pp. 182-185
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==External links==
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*[http://www.cambridge.org/uk/bibles/reb/ Revised English Bible: Cambridge University Press]
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*[http://www.bible-researcher.com/reb.html An Overview of the REB] By Michael Marlowe
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{{English Bible translation navbox}}
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[[Category:1989 books]]
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[[Category:Bible versions and translations]]
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Latest revision as of 12:40, 19 January 2009

The Revised English Bible is a 1989 revision of the New English Bible, which was at the time of its publication (1970 for the complete Bible, 1961 for the New Testament) a popular Bible translation in England. The major differences between the Revised English Bible and the New English Bible are: The Revised English Bible uses "gender-neutral" language, while the New English Bible does not; and the Revised English Bible changed some idiosyncratic translations used in the NEB to the more common usage.