Difference between revisions of "Russian painting"

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'''Russian painting''' has a long and glorious development. In the [[Middle ages]] began the tradition of icon [[painting]] imported from the [[Byzantine Empire]]; it lasted until the Modern age. A masterpiece of Russian iconography is the Virgin of Vladimir (12th century), conserved in [[Moscow]] (it is not a Russian icon, but a gift brought from Constantinople to Russia); it is one of the most venerated [[Orthodox]] icons and a typical example of Byzantine iconography. Religious painting predominated in Russia until the eighteenth century.  
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'''Russian painting''' has a long and glorious development. In the [[Middle ages]] began the tradition of icon [[painting]] imported from the [[Byzantine Empire]]; it lasted until the Modern age. A masterpiece of Russian iconography is the Virgin of Vladimir (12th century), conserved in [[Moscow]] since 1395 (it is not a Russian icon, but a gift brought from Constantinople to Russia); it is one of the most venerated [[Orthodox]] icons and a typical example of Byzantine iconography. Religious painting predominated in Russia until the eighteenth century.  
  
 
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Revision as of 20:00, 1 April 2013

Russian painting has a long and glorious development. In the Middle ages began the tradition of icon painting imported from the Byzantine Empire; it lasted until the Modern age. A masterpiece of Russian iconography is the Virgin of Vladimir (12th century), conserved in Moscow since 1395 (it is not a Russian icon, but a gift brought from Constantinople to Russia); it is one of the most venerated Orthodox icons and a typical example of Byzantine iconography. Religious painting predominated in Russia until the eighteenth century.

See also

Ivan Aivazovsky's hall at the State Russian Museum

External links