Shakespeare and abortion

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William Shakespeare's masterpiece play Hamlet contains implied references to an attempted abortion by taking abortifacients and the subsequently tragic fate of both the mother (Ophelia) and father (Hamlet). Multiple lines in the play are unmistakable in suggesting this,[1] yet liberals never mention this while teaching about Hamlet in public school.

Shakespeare's portrayal of the wealthy, privileged Ophelia and Hamlet as borderline crazy and suicidal may reflect his disapproval of abortion, and his belief that fate is not kind to those who embrace unapologetically that path and outlook. Shakespeare himself was a devout Christian.

Feminists generally identify with Ophelia as being a victim of men, and if she attempted an abortion then that would be lockstep with feminist ideology. But the unnecessarily tragic outcome awaiting Ophelia after making her immoral choices is something feminists tend to be in denial about.

See also

References

  1. http://craftyscreenwriting.com/ophelia.html