Difference between revisions of "Tort"

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Torts are a diverse collection of civil wrongs which are actionable outside of either contract or statute law.  Torts include negligence, private nuisance, public nuisance, breach of statutory duty, defamation, trespass to the person, trespass to land, passing off, malicious falsehood, deceit, conversion and various so-called economic torts.
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A '''tort''' is a civil wrong for which the law provides a remedyThe law of torts is generally separated into negligence and intentional torts.  Under the common law "duty/breach" analysis, negligence is an act or omission that breaches a duty and causes harm.  Generally, people have the duty to act as "reasonably prudent persons" and if a person does not act as a reasonably prudent person and an injury results, the person may be liable in tort.
  
The word tort comes from the Latin ''tortum'' which means bent or twisted.
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Intentional torts include:
  
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'''Torts Against the Person'''
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- Battery
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- Assault
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- False imprisonment
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- Intentional infliction of emotional distress
  
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'''Torts Against Property'''
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- Trespass to land
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- Trespass to chattels
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- Conversion
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- Intentional interference with a contractual relationship
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'''Torts Against Economic and Dignitary Interests'''
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- Defamation
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- Slander
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- Libel
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- Invasion of privacy
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The word tort comes from the [[Latin]] ''tortum'', which means bent or twisted.<ref>http://m-w.com/dictionary/tort</ref>
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==References==
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<references />
  
 
[[Category:Law]]
 
[[Category:Law]]

Revision as of 14:07, 2 October 2008

A tort is a civil wrong for which the law provides a remedy. The law of torts is generally separated into negligence and intentional torts. Under the common law "duty/breach" analysis, negligence is an act or omission that breaches a duty and causes harm. Generally, people have the duty to act as "reasonably prudent persons" and if a person does not act as a reasonably prudent person and an injury results, the person may be liable in tort.

Intentional torts include:

Torts Against the Person - Battery - Assault - False imprisonment - Intentional infliction of emotional distress

Torts Against Property - Trespass to land - Trespass to chattels - Conversion - Intentional interference with a contractual relationship

Torts Against Economic and Dignitary Interests - Defamation - Slander - Libel - Invasion of privacy


The word tort comes from the Latin tortum, which means bent or twisted.[1]

References

  1. http://m-w.com/dictionary/tort