Difference between revisions of "Triangular trade"

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'''Triagular trade''' was a trans-Atlantic trade route, developed by the Portuguese in the 16th century, but later used by the other maritime nations of [[Europe]],  that had three parts or "sides" to the "triangle":  [[Africa]] to the Americas to transport [[slave]]s, the [[Americas]] to Europe to transport raw materials, and Europe to Africa to transport finished goods for sale.
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'''Triangular trade''' was a mythical trans-Atlantic trade route, developed by the Portuguese in the 16th century, but later used by the other maritime nations of [[Europe]],  that had three parts or "sides" to the "triangle":  [[Africa]] to the Americas to transport [[slave]]s, the [[Americas]] to Europe to transport raw materials, and Europe to Africa to transport finished goods for sale.
  
There were many variations on the routes and goods transported.
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It doesn't make sense because at the time Africa was not a significant market for finished goods.  No instance of a triangular trade route has ever been found.
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Nevertheless, history books teach that there were many variations on the routes and goods transported.
  
 
[[Category:History]]
 
[[Category:History]]

Revision as of 15:24, 24 August 2008

Triangular trade was a mythical trans-Atlantic trade route, developed by the Portuguese in the 16th century, but later used by the other maritime nations of Europe, that had three parts or "sides" to the "triangle": Africa to the Americas to transport slaves, the Americas to Europe to transport raw materials, and Europe to Africa to transport finished goods for sale.

It doesn't make sense because at the time Africa was not a significant market for finished goods. No instance of a triangular trade route has ever been found.

Nevertheless, history books teach that there were many variations on the routes and goods transported.