Difference between revisions of "Triangular trade"

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'''Triangular trade''' was a mythical trans-Atlantic [[trade]] route, developed by the [[Portuguese]] in the 16th century, but later used by the other maritime nations of [[Europe]],  that had three parts or "sides" to the "triangle":  [[Africa]] to the [[Americas]] to transport [[slave]]s, the Americas to Europe to transport raw materials, and Europe to Africa to transport finished goods for sale.
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'''Triangular trade''' was a trans-Atlantic [[trade]] route, developed by the [[Portuguese]] in the 16th century, but later used by the other maritime nations of [[Europe]],  that had three parts or "sides" to the "triangle":  [[Africa]] to the [[Americas]] to transport [[slave]]s, the Americas to Europe to transport raw materials, and Europe to Africa to transport finished goods for sale.
  
It doesn't make sense because at the time Africa was not a significant market for finished goods.  No instance of a triangular trade route has ever been found.
 
 
Nevertheless, [[history]] [[book]]s teach that there were many variations on the routes and goods transported.
 
  
 
[[Category:History]]
 
[[Category:History]]

Revision as of 09:09, 2 September 2008

Triangular trade was a trans-Atlantic trade route, developed by the Portuguese in the 16th century, but later used by the other maritime nations of Europe, that had three parts or "sides" to the "triangle": Africa to the Americas to transport slaves, the Americas to Europe to transport raw materials, and Europe to Africa to transport finished goods for sale.