Atheism has a lower retention rate compared to other worldviews

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In 2012, a Georgetown University study was published indicating that only about 30 percent of those who grow up in an atheist household remain atheists as adults.[1]

In 2012, a Georgetown University study was published indicating that only about 30 percent of those who grow up in an atheist household remain atheists as adults.[2] Similarly, according to recent research by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life, in the United States, a majority of those surveyed who were raised in atheist or agnostic households, or where there was no specific religious attachment, later chose to join a religious faith.[3][4] A notable example of a person raised in a atheistic household who later became a Christian is William J. Murray. Mr. Murray is the son of the late atheist Madalyn Murray O'Hair who founded the organization American Atheists. In 1982, William J. Murray founded the Religious Freedom Coalition.

An article published by a Question evolution! campaign group entitled Georgetown University study provides two clues to shrinking atheism faster declares:

Since atheism has a low retention rate among people raised atheists, one of the best methods of speeding up the global decline of atheism is though evolutionism and atheism inoculation. In other words, let Christians and the general public know about the many problems of atheism and evolutionary ideology and the many problems they cause BEFORE individuals consider becoming atheists (Atheism and suicide, atheism and its history of mass murder, etc. See: Atheism)...

Atheism, agnosticism and evolutionism do not stand up under critical examination that is why Richard Dawkins, the British Humanist Association and leading evolutionists have recently ducked notable debate offers. They know their weak ideologies cannot withstand cross-examination.[5]

In addition, in atheistic Communist China, Christianity is experiencing explosive growth.[6][7] On July 3, 2005, the New York Times reported concerning many countries in the former Soviet Union: "A return to religion in Romania and the region's other formerly Communist countries has in many places outrun the speed at which the church can screen and train clergy..."[8]

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