Difference between revisions of "Work"

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<ref>Serway and Beichner, ''Physics for Scientists and Engineers'', Fifth Edition</ref>.
 
<ref>Serway and Beichner, ''Physics for Scientists and Engineers'', Fifth Edition</ref>.
  
<math>\bold{W} = \bold{F} · \bold{d}</math>
+
<math>\bold{W} = \bold{F} \cdot \bold{d}</math>
  
 
Or, its integral form:
 
Or, its integral form:
  
\int \bold{F} \cdot \mathrm{d}\bold{s}
+
<math>\int \bold{F} \cdot \mathrm{d}\bold{s}</math>
  
 
Or:
 
Or:

Revision as of 17:40, 9 May 2009

In physics, work refers to the product of force and distance vectors [1].

Or, its integral form:

Or:

W = F d cos θ

Where θ is the angle that separates the vectors. The second form of the equation is the expanded form of the "dot product" in the first equation. In physics, the dot product "a · b" (read "a dot b") can be rewritten as "a b cos θ".

Work is a transfer of energy; if W is positive, there is a transfer of energy to the system, and if W is negative there is a transfer of energy from the system.

Its units are that of force multiplied by distance, in SI this is Newton · Meter, or Joule

References

  1. Serway and Beichner, Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Fifth Edition