Atheism, evolutionism, Britain and food science

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A food science laboratory.

See also: Atheism and food science

The Institute of Food Technologists defines food science as "the discipline in which the engineering, biological, and physical sciences are used to study the nature of foods, the causes of deterioration, the principles underlying food processing, and the improvement of foods for the consuming public".[1]

According the Institute of Food Science & Technology:

The evolution of novel data processing technologies is fast paced and the volume of data being generated is growing by the second. The food industry stands to benefit from this and has been testing and adapting various routes for using data science techniques to enhance the production of safe and healthy foods.

Data science requires a multidisciplinary approach and a broad range of skill sets, from mathematics and statistics, computer science and machine learning to artificial intelligence (AI).[2]

Despite the efforts of food scientists in irreligious cultures to develop more flavorful food, there have been a significant amount of irreligious cultures with bland food that is not exciting from a culinary point of view (See also: Atheism and food science).

evolution darwin theory
Late in Charles Darwin's life, Darwin told the Duke of Argyll that he frequently had overwhelming thoughts that the natural world was the result of design.[3] See also: 15 questions for evolutionists

Since World War II a majority of the most prominent and vocal defenders of the evolutionary position which employs methodological naturalism have been atheists and agnostics.[4]


Charles Darwin (12 February 1809–19 April 1882) was a famous naturalist born in Britain. He is best known for popularizing the idea of evolution by natural selection presented in his book On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life (commonly referred to simply as The Origin of Species).

There is a cult of personality and type of religiosity currently surrounding Charles Darwin. Stephen Jay Gould wrote the following in 1978: ""... all theories [of natural selection] cite God in their support, and ... Darwin comes close to this status among evolutionary biologists ...".[5] In 2002, Michael White similarly wrote: "Of course today, for biologists, Darwin is second only to God, and for many he may rank still higher."[6]

As noted above, the Institute of Food Technologists defines food science as "the discipline in which the engineering, biological, and physical sciences are used to study the nature of foods, the causes of deterioration, the principles underlying food processing, and the improvement of foods for the consuming public". (bolding in the quote added for emphasis)[7]

Britain, is the birthplace of Darwinism and the British naturalist Darwin made evolutionary ideas popular. Thus, Britain is arguably the fountainhead of evolutionary ideas.

Stephen Wolfram in his book A New Kind of Science has stated that the Darwinian theory of evolution has, in recent years, "increasingly been applied outside of biology."[8]

And yet, International food authority Andrew Zimmern said of Britain's food: “Twenty years ago the food of the British Isles was universally considered to be among the world’s worst—boring, bland and boiled.”[9]

Britain's scientific community, despite having over 100 years post Charles Darwin, failed to substantially improve Britain's food science practices and biology is an integral part of food science.

In addition, Britain's evolutionists staunchly defend evolutionism despite its major and numerous flaws (See: 15 questions for evolutionists and Problems with evolutionary theory).

On the other hand, the United States which has the highest rate of creationism in the developed world and a long history of significant immigration, likely has a much greater plentitude of flavorful, ethnic restaurants such as Mexican, Italian, Japanese, French, Greek, Thai, Spanish, Indian and Mediterranean restaurants than Britain - despite Britain having a history of a lot of bland food.[10] For example, London, one of Britain's most ethnic cities has about 200 restaurants per capita while New York City has 300 restaurants per capita (Paris, France has about 365 restaurants per capita).[11] On top of this, a great many of the ethnic restaurants in London are run by religious immigrants from Africa, the Carribean, Turkey, Poland, and Latino countries and and are definitely not atheists.[12]

See also

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