Atheism, penile cancer and depression

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The medical journal article Risk Factors and Prevalence of Penile Cancer states:"...in a society where masculinity is defined by and associated with the presence of the phallus, penile cancer affects male self-esteem and may lead to depression. The vexing issue with penile cancer lies in the fact that it is a largely preventable disease, where significant risk factors are modifiable."[1] See also: Atheism and cancer and Atheism and depression and Atheism and self-esteem

According to WebMD, "Penile cancer, or cancer of the penis, is when cells grow out of control on or in a man’s penis."

There are a number of practices positively correlated to atheism/irreligion that increases an individuals risk for penile cancer (see: Atheism and penile cancer).

Some of the risk factors related to the development of penile cancer are: lack of male circumcision, sexual promiscuity, HPV virus, AIDS, homosexuality (see: Homosexuality and penile cancer), smoking, obesity, being over the age of 60, and bestiality.[2] See also: Atheism, circumcision and penile cancer and Atheism and sexual immorality articles and Atheism and homosexuality and Atheism and smoking and Atheism and obesity and Global atheism and aging populations and Atheism and bestiality

The medical journal article Risk Factors and Prevalence of Penile Cancer states: "...in a society where masculinity is defined by and associated with the presence of the phallus, penile cancer affects male self-esteem and may lead to depression. The vexing issue with penile cancer lies in the fact that it is a largely preventable disease, where significant risk factors are modifiable."[3]

See also:

The Telegraph reported: "Patients with a strong “intrinsic faith” (a deep personal belief, not just a social inclination to go to a place of worship) recover 70 per cent faster from depression than those who are not deeply religious."[4]

Concerning atheism and depression, a University of Michigan study involving 19,775 individuals found that religious people are less likely than atheists to suffer depression when they are lonely.[5] See also: Atheism and suicide

There are preliminary studies indicating that individuals who reject Christianity in Western cultures have lower self-esteem than the Christian population.[6][7] There are also studies indicating that lower self-esteem is associated with suicidality.[8][9] Atheists have higher rates of suicide than the general population.[10][11][12] At the same time, there is a significant portion of the atheist population who suffer from excess self-esteem/pride issues (see: Atheism and arrogance).

References