Australia, irreligion and obesity

From Conservapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
In 2014, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation declared: "Obesity rates in Australia are climbing faster than anywhere else in the world, according to a new study."[1]

After WWII, Australia has become a very secular country.[2]

According to the Sydney Morning Herald:

Australia is one of the least devout countries in the Western world, although two-thirds of its population identifies itself as Christian, an international survey comparing religious expression in 21 countries has found.

Religion does not play a central part in the lives of many Australians: 48 per cent of Australians surveyed said they did not partake in personal prayer and 52 per cent said they rarely attended a place of worship for religious reasons.[3]

Australia and obesity

In 2014, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation declared:

Obesity rates in Australia are climbing faster than anywhere else in the world, according to a new study.

The results of the global study into obesity rates, published in the medical journal The Lancet, show almost a quarter of the country's children and 63 per cent of the adult population is overweight.[4]

On February 17, 2019, Wikipedia (an online encyclopedia founded by an atheist and agnostic) declared in its article entitled Obesity in Australia:

According to 2007 statistics from the World Health Organization (WHO), Australia has the third-highest prevalence of overweight adults in the English-speaking world. Obesity in Australia is an "epidemic" with "increasing frequency." The Medical Journal of Australia found that obesity in Australia more than doubled in the two decades preceding 2003... The rise in obesity has been attributed to poor eating habits in the country closely related to the availability of fast food since the 1970s, sedentary lifestyles and a decrease in the labour workforce.[5]

Atheism and obesity

According to the Gallup Inc., "Very religious Americans are more likely to practice healthy behaviors than those who are moderately religious or nonreligious."[6]

See also: Atheism and obesity

The current atheist population mostly resides in East Asia (particularly China) and in secular Europe/Australia primarily among whites.[7] See: Global atheism and Western atheism and race

Secular Europe and communist China have significant problems with obesity (see: Secular Europe and obesity and China and obesity).

In the United States at the present time, the greater the degree of irreligiosity in a generation, the higher their obesity rate is.

According to the Gallup Inc., "Very religious Americans are more likely to practice healthy behaviors than those who are moderately religious or nonreligious."[8]

In addition, a significant number of prominent atheists are overweight (see: Atheism and obesity).

Australia, irreligion, alcoholism and obesity

See also: Irreligious Australia and alcoholism and Atheism and alcoholism

In November 2013, The Australian Broadcasting Corporation indicated: "The report found 20 per cent of Australians are now drinking at levels that put them at risk of lifetime harm from injury or disease."[9]

Research indicates that heavy drinking may contribute to obesity. For example, a study found that frequent, light drinkers (3 to 7 drinking days per week, 1 drink per drinking day) had lower BMIs than infrequent, but heavier drinkers.[10]

Atheists and atheistic cultures often have significant problems with excess alcohol usage (For more information please see: Atheism and alcoholism).

At least 100 studies suggests religion has a positive effect on preventing alcohol-related problems, researchers Christopher Ellison, Jennifer Barrett and Benjamin Moulton noted in an article in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion on “Gender, Marital Status, and Alcohol Behavior: The Neglected Role of Religion.”[11] See: Atheism and alcoholism

The BBC declared in 2017:

The vast majority of Australians worry that national drinking habits are excessive, according to new research...

The World Health Organization ranks Australia 19th on the global alcohol consumption ladder, ahead of Ireland at 21, the UK at 25, New Zealand at 31, Canada at 40 and the United States at 48.[12]

In November 2013, The Australian Broadcasting Corporation indicated:

ANCD chairman Dr. John Herron says the report shows more work needs to be done to tackle the problem.

"The level of alcohol-related damage occurring in our communities is simply appalling," he said.

"The health, social and economic costs associated with alcohol use simply cannot be allowed to continue at the current level."

The report found 20 per cent of Australians are now drinking at levels that put them at risk of lifetime harm from injury or disease.

ANCD report key findings:

Almost 1 in 8 deaths of people aged under 25 is due to alcohol

60% of all police attendances (including 90% of late-night calls) involve alcohol

One in 5 hospitalisations of people under 25 are due to alcohol

20% of Australians drink at levels putting them at risk of lifetime harm

Almost two thirds of 18-29 year olds drink "specifically to get drunk"

One in four Australians reported being a victim of alcohol-related verbal abuse.[13]

See also

References

  1. Australian obesity rates climbing faster than anywhere else in the world, study shows, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 28 May 2014, 10:28pm
  2. Stephanie Painter, Vivienne Ryan and Bethany Hiatt, (15 June 2010). "Australians losing the faith". Newspaper. West Australian Newspapers Ltd. Retrieved 15 June 2010
  3. God's OK, it's just the religion bit we don't like
  4. Australian obesity rates climbing faster than anywhere else in the world, study shows, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 28 May 2014, 10:28pm
  5. Obesity in Australia, Wikipedia, February 17, 2019
  6. http://www.gallup.com/poll/145379/Religious-Americans-Lead-Healthier-Lives.aspx
  7. A surprising map of where the world’s atheists live, By Max Fisher and Caitlin Dewey, Washington Post, May 23, 2013
  8. http://www.gallup.com/poll/145379/Religious-Americans-Lead-Healthier-Lives.aspx
  9. One in eight deaths of young Australians attributable to alcohol: National Council on Drugs report By Jane Mower, Updated 19 Nov 2013, 7:28pm
  10. Breslow et al. Drinking Patterns and Body Mass Index in Never Smokers: National Health Interview Survey, 1997–2001. Am J Epidemiol 2005;161:368–376.
  11. The Doubled-Edged Sword of Religion and Alcoholism
  12. Australians worry about alcohol abuse, survey says, BBC, 2017
  13. One in eight deaths of young Australians attributable to alcohol: National Council on Drugs report By Jane Mower, Updated 19 Nov 2013, 7:28pm