Donald Trump achievements: Healthcare, welfare, and other social issues

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Official presidential photo of President Donald Trump
Main article: Donald Trump achievements

This article is a non-exhaustive list of achievements by U.S. President Donald Trump, his administration, and Congress related to healthcare, welfare, and other social issues.

For social policy achievements related to abortion, religious liberty, and LGBTQ issues, see Donald Trump achievements: Abortion and Donald Trump achievements: Religious liberty and LGBT. For social policy achievements related to the military, see Donald Trump achievements: Military, national security, and anti-terrorism. For law enforcement on opioids, as opposed to other efforts to treat the epidemic, see Donald Trump achievements: Criminal justice, law enforcement, and other DOJ matters.

2017

President Trump signs an executive order improving healthcare, October 12, 2017

United States Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price, who resigned in late September 2017, used his tenure as secretary to advance numerous conservative policies.[1]

Legislation signed, 2017

Executive actions, 2017

The Trump Administration took actions related to healthcare:

  • January 20, 2017—On his first day in office, Trump signed an executive order that would lessen Obamacare's burden while Republicans work to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.[3]
  • August 31, 2017—The HHS announced that it would cut ObamaCare outreach funding by 90%.[4]
  • October 12, 2017—President Trump signed an executive order to increase market competition and make the healthcare market freer, such as by expanding access to plans that reach across state lines and which do not have to comply with ObamaCare rules.[5] The Labor Department finalized the rule resulting from this order in June 2018,[6] and on August 1, 2018, the HHS released a rule resulting from the order to give Americans greater access to short-term non-Obamacare plans.[7] On October 22, 2018, the Trump Administration released the third rule resulting from the order,[8] and it finalized that rule on June 13, 2019.[9]
  • October 12, 2017—The Trump Administration announced it would stop paying Obamacare subsidies, which a federal court ruled during the Obama Administration to be unconstitutional.[10]

The Trump Administration took actions related to welfare:

  • August 30, 2017—The Department of Health and Human Services rescinded an Obama-era directive that had allowed states to request a waiver to ignore work requirements for the poor in order to receive welfare.[11]
  • In addition to creating initiatives to reduce food stamp usage,[12] the Trump Administration cracked down on food stamp fraud.[13]

The Trump Administration worked to combat the opioid crisis:

  • October 26, 2017—President Trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency.[14]

Other achievements, 2017

While the following achievements were not official United States government policy actions by the Trump Administration, they were closely related to the Trump Administration and its policies:

  • Food stamp levels fell after Trump took office.[12][15] By August 2017, the number of people on food stamps had fallen by 1.1 million people since the beginning of Trump's presidency,[16] and it was reported in September 2017 that the number of people using food stamps had declined each month of Trump's presidency to that point.[17] By the end of Fiscal Year 2017, the number of people on food stamps had dropped by over 2 million,[18] and the number fell to 2.2 million fewer in Trump's first full year in office.[19] In FY 2017, the federal government spent the lowest amount of money on the food stamp program in seven years.[20] Between October and November 2017, four million people stopped using food stamps,[21] and in December 2017, it dropped by over 500,000.[22] According to the USDA, in 2017, participation in the Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) food stamp and welfare program reached its lowest level in 17 years.[23] In 2017, the number of people applying for disability benefits through the Social Security Administration fell below 1.5 million – the lowest level since 2002, and something attributed to the strong economy.[24] The drop was so large that the SSA had to revise its estimates of how much longer the program would remain financially stable.[24]

Failures, 2017

Many of these failures and setbacks to the MAGA agenda, if not all of them, were caused by Congress or officials in the Trump Administration, rather than President Trump himself:

  • August 2017—Not only did Secretary of State Rex Tillerson announce he would keep two programs in the department intended to increase racial diversity,[25] but he announced that the department would take further action for racial diversity, such as considering at least one minority for every ambassadorship position.[26]

2018

In the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Secretary Ben Carson worked to advance a conservative agenda.[27] Meanwhile, the Trump Administration took steps to encourage Americans to opt out of Obamacare and receive less expensive plans.[28] The administration also tried to fight rising drug prices,[29][30] and in 2018, drug prices declined by the largest percentage in forty-six years.[31] In 2018, the number of drug overdose deaths fell for the first time since 1990,[32] and they fell significantly in states deeply affected by the opioid crisis.[33]

Legislation signed, 2018

  • May 30, 2018—President Trump signed the Right to Try Act of 2017 into law, which gave terminally ill patients the right to try experimental treatments without full approval from the Food and Drug Administration.[34]
  • October 10, 2018—President Trump signed two bills into law, both of them banning "gag clauses" that disallow pharmacists from telling patients that they can pay less for prescriptions by not using their insurance.[35]
  • October 24, 2018—President Trump signed into law a major bill combatting the opioid crisis through several different measures.[36]

Executive actions, 2018

The Trump Administration took actions related to healthcare:

  • April 9, 2018—The HHS released two new ObamaCare regulations that expanded exemptions to the individual mandate and gave the states more flexibility.[37]
  • June 19, 2018—The Labor Department finalized a new rule – resulting from an executive order President Trump signed in October 2017 – expanding association health plans so that small business owners join together to buy health insurance plans outside of ObamaCare's strict regulations.[6]
  • July 10, 2018—The Trump Administration announced it would cut funding for Obamacare outreach from $36.8 million to $10 million – the funding was at $62.5 million before the Trump Administration began cutting it in 2017.[38]
  • July 17, 2018—The Food and Drug Administration released a draft guidance to make it easier for consumers to buy more medicines without a prescription, beginning the process of enacting new rules on the matter.[39]
  • August 1, 2018—The Labor Department released a final rule to expand Americans' access to short-term non-Obamacare healthcare plans, reversing an April 2016 Obama-era regulation.[7]
  • August 7, 2018—The HHS announced it would allow insurers participating in the Medicare Advantage program to negotiate with pharmaceutical companies to lower drug prices.[40]
  • August 29, 2018—The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services moved to give Medicare drug plans more choices they could offer to customers in order to lower drug prices.[41]
  • October 4, 2018—The CMS announced it would implement several changes to improve its oversight of organizations that accredit hospitals.[42]
  • October 15, 2018—The HHS announced it would enact a regulation requiring pharmaceutical companies to list their drug prices in their TV commercials, a step intended to help lower drug prices.[30][43]
  • October 22, 2018—The HHS announced it would allow the states to offer cheaper ObamaCare plans with fewer of the law's requirements yet still be able to receive federal subsidies.[44]
  • October 22, 2018—The Trump Administration proposed a rule to allow employers contribute to cheaper health reimbursement arrangements, reversing an Obama-era regulation.[8] The administration released the finalized version of this rule on June 13, 2019.[9]
  • October 23, 2018—The Trump Administration began a program to help mothers and babies affected by opioids.[45]
  • November 13, 2018—The Trump Administration gave more flexibility to the states to provide inpatient mental health treatment for individuals.[46]
  • November 29, 2018—The Trump Administration announced four ways it would give waivers to the states so they could receive federal subsidies for health care plans that do not meet ObamaCare's requirements.[47]

The Trump Administration took actions related to welfare:

  • January 11, 2018—The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services issued a guidance that made it easier for states to enact programs requiring Medicaid recipients to work in order to continue receiving those benefits.[48]
  • The USDA took several steps to protect against fraud in its food stamp programs, including hiring a "chief integrity officer" to oversee those efforts.[49]
  • April 10, 2018—President Trump signed an executive order calling for a government-wide review of welfare programs for the purpose of ensuring that they help Americans find work and escape poverty. The order also called on the federal government to create or strengthen work requirements for its welfare programs.[50]
  • December 20, 2018—The USDA announced it would implement stricter work requirements for its SNAP food stamp program.[51]

The Trump Administration took actions on other social issues:

  • May 19, 2018—Among its steps to reverse Obama Administration "fair housing" policies, the Department of Housing and Urban Development withdrew a computer tool it used to identify instances of segregation due to it being unhelpful.[52]
  • July 3, 2018—The DOJ rescinded seven Obama Administration guidance documents that promoted affirmative action in colleges and universities.[53]
  • August 13, 2018—HUD began the process of revising the Obama Administration's 2015 Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing regulation in order to increase local control and efficiency, among other goals.[54]
  • August 30, 2018—The DOJ filed a "Statement of Interest" supporting ethnically-Asian students in their lawsuit against Harvard University that alleged that the school discriminated against them in the admissions process because of their ethnicity.[55] It was revealed in September 2018 that the DOJ had also begun investigation racial discrimination at Yale University.[56]

Other achievements, 2018

While the following achievements were not official United States government policy actions by the Trump Administration, they were closely related to the Trump Administration and its policies:

  • The number of Americans on food stamps fell by 1.3 million between December 2017 and February 2018.[57] In February 2018, the number of households using food stamps dropped below 20 million for the first time since 2010,[58] and in March 2018, overall enrollment fell to the lowest level in eight years,[59] something attributed to economic growth and the Trump Administration's efforts to crack down on fraud.[60] In March 2018, participation in the WIC welfare program fell to its lowest level in 24 years.[61] In April 2018, food stamp enrollment fell below 40 million for the first time since February 2010.[62] By May 2018, 2.8 million Americans had stopped using food stamps since the beginning of Trump's presidency.[63] By July 2018, the number of people on food stamps fell to the lowest level since November 2009,[64] and participation continued to fall.[65] Between February 2017 and September 2018, the number of people on food stamps fell by 3.5 million,[66] and it reached 3.8 million by November 2018.[67] Between September 2017 and September 2018, food stamp enrollment fell in 47 of the 50 states.[68] By October 2018, the number of households on food stamps fell by 1.4 million since the beginning of Trump's presidency.[69] In December 2018, the number of people on food stamps fell to 37 million for the first time since October 2009.[70] In Fiscal Year 2018, the number of people on food stamps declined each month.[71] These reductions in food stamp use saved taxpayers over $8.5 billion by late 2018.[72]
  • It was reported in May 2018 that drug prices had dropped since the beginning of the Trump Administration, something attributed to the administration.[73] Overall in 2018, drug prices declined by the largest percentage in forty-six years.[31]
  • May 11, 2018—President Trump announced his plan to lower drug prices, which he did while criticizing the drug industry and foreign governments for its practices that hurt American citizens.[74] On October 25, 2018, President Trump announced a plan to lower U.S. drug prices to that of other countries.[75]

Failures, 2018

Many of these failures and setbacks to the MAGA agenda, if not all of them, were caused by Congress or officials in the Trump Administration, rather than President Trump himself:

2019

President Trump signing an executive order improving Medicare coverage, October 3, 2019

By early 2019, President Trump had made significant progress in advancing better healthcare for Americans,[77] and ObamaCare premiums fell because of the administration's waivers to the program.[78] Trump's policies led to much progress for blacks, homosexuals, Jews,[79] and Hispanics.[80] By 2019, FDA Commissioner and Trump appointee Scott Gottlieb, who announced his resignation that year, had made significant progress advancing President Trump's agenda.[81] Meanwhile, the HHS continued taking steps to add work requirements for Medicaid,[82] and President Trump continued fighting the opioid crisis.[83] The Trump Administration continued pushing for drug price transparency and worked to lower drug prices.[84] Additionally, the Department of Housing and Urban Development worked to lower the cost of housing and reduce regulations.[85]

Executive actions, 2019

The Trump Administration took actions related to healthcare:

  • January 31, 2019—The HHS proposed banning rebates in Medicare and Medicaid for pharmacy benefit managers, a significant action and one the HHS took to reduce drug prices.[86]
  • February 11, 2019—The CMS released two rules to increase patients' access to their health data.[87]
  • March 25, 2019—The DOJ changed its legal position on ObamaCare, now arguing the law was completely unconstitutional rather than in part.[88] On May 1, 2019, the DOJ released its full legal argument for completely striking down ObamaCare.[89]
  • April 18, 2019—The National Institute of Drug Abuse announced a program in which it would spend $350 million in Kentucky, Massachusetts, New York, and Ohio to reduce opioid-related deaths in those states.[90]
  • April 22, 2019—The Trump Administration began a program finding new ways to pay primary-care doctors to reduce Medicare costs.[91]
  • May 8, 2019—The HHS released a rule requiring drug companies to disclose their drugs' prices in TV commercials as a way to pressure them to reduce costs for consumers.[92]
  • June 3, 2019—The FDA announced it would make it easier for cancer patients to access experimental drugs.[93]
  • June 13, 2019—The Trump Administration released a final rule allowing employers to contribute to cheaper health reimbursement arrangements, the third step of a three-part order signed by President Trump in 2017.[9]
  • June 24, 2019—President Trump signed an executive order that required hospitals to disclose their healthcare prices.[94] On July 29, 2019, the Trump Administration released a proposed rule to implement the order,[95] and it released additional rules on November 15, 2019, that required insurers as well as hospitals to disclose their healthcare prices.[96]
  • July 10, 2019—President Trump signed an executive order to improve kidney disease care, including making it easier to obtain transplants and in-home dialysis, as well as taking steps to lower prices.[97]
  • July 17, 2019—The IRS issued guidance making it easier for Americans with high-deductible health plans to access medications for chronic diseases.[98]
  • July 31, 2019—The Trump Administration announced two proposals to lower drug prices, including allowing drug imports from Canada.[99]
  • August 22, 2019—The HHS proposed changing privacy rules on addiction treatment to help doctors provide better care for patients.[100]
  • September 4, 2019—The HHS announced it would award $1.8 billion in grants to fight the opioid crisis.[101]
  • September 19, 2019—President Trump signed an executive order to help develop better vaccines against seasonal influenza and a potential flu pandemic.[102]
  • October 3, 2019—President Trump signed an executive order strengthening and giving a more prominent role to Medicare Advantage, a privately-operated section of Medicare.[103]
  • October 9, 2019—The Trump Administration proposed relaxing anti-kickback rules for the purpose of modernization and easing the burden on doctors and hospitals.[104]
  • October 30, 2019—The White House launched a website to help people find addiction treatment and combat the opioid crisis.[105]

The Trump Administration took actions related to welfare:

  • May 6, 2019—The Trump Administration released a proposal to change the federal government's method of measuring poverty, something which would eventually reduce the number of Americans on welfare.[106]
  • July 23, 2019—The Department of Agriculture proposed a rule to close a loophole that had allowed 3.1 million people on the TANF program to double-dip into the SNAP program.[107]

The Trump Administration took actions on other social issues:

  • January 2019—The Education Department began investigating claims of anti-male discrimination at the University of Michigan.[108]
  • February 11, 2019—The Food and Drug Administration took steps to increase its oversight over dietary supplements.[109]
  • March 21, 2019—President Trump signed an executive order to protect campus free speech rights by denying federal research funding to universities that do not protect free speech.[110]
  • April 9, 2019—It was reported that the Trump Administration had required Texas Tech University's medical school to stop using race as a factor in its admissions policy.[111]
  • June 25, 2019—President Trump signed an executive order creating the White House Council on Eliminating Barriers to Affordable Housing Development, intended to reduce regulations that made housing more expensive.[112]
  • August 19, 2019—The Department of Housing and Urban Development proposed reversing an Obama-era regulation that made it easier to "prove" unintentional housing discrimination.[113]
  • August 29, 2019—The U.S. Surgeon General issued a warning against using marijuana because of its health risks, the first marijuana-related advisory since the 1980s.[114]

Other achievements, 2019

While the following achievements were not official United States government policy actions by the Trump Administration, they were closely related to the Trump Administration and its policies:

  • Rather than retreat on healthcare and avoid the topic, President Trump continued advocating against ObamaCare.[115]
  • May 9, 2019—The pharmaceutical company Gilead announced it would donate an anti-HIV drug for as many as 200,000 people, something it did after discussions with the Trump Administration and something advancing the administration's goal of ending HIV in the U.S.[116]
  • The number of Americans using food stamps continued declining, something attributed to new work requirements and other restrictions on food stamp use,[117] and something which resulted in reduced dependence on the government.[118] In April 2019, the number of individuals on food stamps fell to the lowest level in ten years,[119] and the following month, the number of households fell to the lowest level in nine years.[120] By June 2019, over 6.2 million individuals stopped using food stamps since President Trump took office,[121] and by July 2019, over 2.5 million households had stopped using food stamps.[122] The number of jobless Americans receiving unemployment benefits fell to very low levels partially because of stricter eligibility standards.[123]
  • In late 2018 and in 2019, the drug price index for prescription drugs fell at the fastest pace since the 1960s.[124]

Failures, 2019

  • February 19, 2019—FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb threatened to force states to end any vaccine exemptions if they did not voluntarily do so.[125]

References

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  2. Multiple references: See also:
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  6. 6.0 6.1 Multiple references: For the actual rule: See also:
  7. 7.0 7.1 Multiple references: See also:
  8. 8.0 8.1 Multiple references: See also:
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 Multiple references: Statements by President Trump: The overall impact and substance of the three rules coming from the 2017 executive order: See also:
  10. Multiple references:
  11. Multiple references:
  12. 12.0 12.1 Rodriguez, Katherine (December 25, 2017). Seven Reasons 2017 Was the Year of the Food Stamp Turnaround. Breitbart News. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  13. Rodriquez, Katherine (December 25, 2017). The Seven Biggest Takedowns of Food Stamp Fraud in 2017. Breitbart News. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  14. Multiple references: Effects of the declaration in the following year: Other government actions: See also:
  15. Multiple references:
  16. Rodriguez, Katherine (August 7, 2017). More Than 1.1 Million Fewer Americans on Food Stamps Under Trump. Breitbart News. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
    Food stamp enrollment fell in 46 out of the 50 states: By October 2017, the number of people on food stamps had fallen 1.5 million since Trump's election:
  17. Rodriguez, Katherine (September 18, 2017). Food Stamp Usage Has Fallen Every Month of Trump Presidency. Breitbart News. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  18. Multiple references: For data at the end of the calendar year 2017:
  19. Rodriguez, Katherine (May 10, 2018). 2.2 Million Fewer People on Food Stamps Under Donald Trump. Breitbart News. Retrieved May 10, 2018.
  20. Rodriguez, Katherine (December 12, 2017). Food Stamp Program Costs Hit Seven-Year Low. Breitbart News. Retrieved December 13, 2017.
  21. Rodriguez, Katherine (February 7, 2018). Food Stamp Enrollment Drops by Four Million in One Month. Breitbart News. Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  22. Rodriguez, Katherine (April 15, 2018). Food Stamp Usage Drops over Half-Million in a Single Month. Breitbart News. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
    See also:
  23. Rodriguez, Katherine (December 24, 2017). WIC Welfare Participation Hits 17-Year Low. Breitbart News. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  24. 24.0 24.1 Multiple references:
  25. Gehrke, Joel (August 18, 2017). State Department: 'Even the white guys' support diversity program. Washington Examiner. Retrieved August 20, 2017.
  26. Multiple references:
  27. Multiple references:
  28. Pappas, Alex (August 10, 2018). ObamaCare Double Whammy: Two big Trump changes could spur insurance exchange exodus. Fox News. Retrieved August 10, 2018.
    See also: Unable to repeal ObamaCare, the Trump Administration was able to stabilize it: ObamaCare enrollments significantly declined in 2018, something some observers attributed to the Trump Administration's policies: Regarding prices for short-term healthcare plans:
  29. Multiple references:
  30. 30.0 30.1 Weixel, Nathaniel (October 17, 2018). Trump officials ratchet up drug pricing fight. The Hill. Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  31. 31.0 31.1 Moran, Sean (February 5, 2019). Fact Check: Yes, Prescription Drugs Dropped by Largest % in 46 Years Under Trump. Breitbart News. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  32. Multiple references: See also:
  33. Stein, Shira (October 30, 2019). Overdose Deaths Drop Sharply in States Hard Hit by Opioid Crisis (1). Bloomberg Law. Retrieved October 31, 2019.
  34. Multiple references: See also:
  35. Multiple references:
  36. Multiple references: See also:
  37. Multiple references: Pro-life individuals also received an exemption from the individual mandate if the only plans available included abortion coverage: See also:
  38. Multiple references: See also:
  39. Multiple references:
  40. Multiple references:
  41. King, Robert (August 29, 2018). Trump administration moves to give Medicare drug plans more control over their offerings. Washington Examiner. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  42. Armour, Stephanie (October 4, 2018). Trump Administration to Step Up Oversight of Hospital Watchdogs. The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved October 6, 2018.
  43. Multiple references: A conservative criticism of the decision:
  44. Multiple references:
  45. Multiple references:
  46. Multiple references:
  47. Multiple references:
  48. Multiple references:
  49. Rodriquez, Katherine (March 31, 2018). USDA Hires ‘Integrity Officer’ to Fight Fraud in Food Stamp Program. Breitbart News. Retrieved March 31, 2018.
  50. Multiple references: See also:
  51. Multiple references: See also:
  52. Multiple references: See also:
  53. Multiple references: See also:
  54. Multiple references: See also:
  55. Multiple references: See also:
  56. Multiple references: See also:
  57. Rodriguez, Katherine (May 9, 2018). Food Stamp Enrollment Drops by 1.3 Million in Two Months. Breitbart News. Retrieved May 9, 2018.
    See also:
  58. Rodriguez, Katherine (June 11, 2018). Food Stamp Households Drop Below 20 Million for First Time Since 2010. Breitbart News. Retrieved June 11, 2018.
  59. Rodriguez, Katherine (June 12, 2018). Food Stamp Enrollment Dips to Lowest Level in 8 Years. Breitbart News. Retrieved June 12, 2018.
  60. O'Reilly, Andrew (June 18, 2018). Food stamp enrollment falls to 8-year low as Trump clamps down on fraud, economy improves. Fox News. Retrieved June 18, 2018.
  61. Rodriguez, Katherine (June 19, 2018). WIC Welfare Participation at Lowest Level in 24 Years. Breitbart News. Retrieved June 19, 2018.
  62. Rodriguez, Katherine (July 11, 2018). Food Stamp Usage Drops Below 40 Million for First Time in 8 Years. Breitbart News. Retrieved July 11, 2018.
    See also:
  63. Rodriguez, Katherine (August 5, 2018). 2.8 Million People Drop Off Food Stamps Under Trump. Breitbart News. Retrieved August 5, 2018.
  64. Rodriguez, Katherine (October 8, 2018). Food Stamp Enrollment Dips to Lowest Level Since November 2009. Breitbart News. Retrieved October 8, 2018.
  65. Rodriguez, Katherine (November 11, 2018). Food Stamp Participation Reaches Lowest Level in Nearly a Decade. Breitbart News. Retrieved November 11, 2018.
  66. Rodriguez, Katherine (December 10, 2018). 3.5 Million People Drop Off Food Stamps Under Trump. Breitbart News. Retrieved December 10, 2018.
    By December 2018:
  67. Rodriguez, Katherine (March 3, 2019). 3.8 Million Drop Off Food Stamps Under Trump. Breitbart News. Retrieved March 3, 2019.
  68. Rodriguez, Katherine (December 16, 2018). Food Stamp Enrollment Drops in 47 States. Breitbart News. Retrieved December 17, 2018.
  69. Multiple references:
  70. Rodriguez, Katherine (March 18, 2019). Food Stamp Usage Falls to 37 Million for First Time Since October 2009. Breitbart News. Retrieved March 18, 2019.
  71. Rodriguez, Katherine (February 18, 2019). Food Stamp Participation Declines for 12 Straight Months. Breitbart News. Retrieved February 18, 2019.
  72. Svab, Petr (March 4, 2019). Food Stamp Enrollment Declines Under Trump, Saving Taxpayers Billions. The Epoch Times. Retrieved March 4, 2019.
  73. Bedard, Paul (May 7, 2018). Drug prices drop, Trump crackdown credited. Washington Examiner. Retrieved May 9, 2018.
  74. Multiple references: See also:
  75. Multiple references: See also:
  76. Multiple references:
  77. Pollak, Joel B. (March 28, 2019). Pollak: President Trump’s Top 10 Health Care Achievements. Breitbart News. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
    See also:
  78. Moran, Sean (August 14, 2019). Study: Trump Waivers Led to First Drop in Obamacare Premiums. Breitbart News. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
    See also: Further drop in ObamaCare premiums:
  79. Pollak, Joel B. (February 22, 2019). Blue State Blues: Trump Is the Most ‘Progressive’ President Ever for Blacks, Gays, Jews. Breitbart News. Retrieved February 22, 2019.
    See also:
  80. Multiple references:
  81. Multiple references: See also: Further actions in 2019:
  82. Multiple references: See also:
  83. Multiple references: See also:
  84. Multiple references:
  85. Multiple references: See also:
  86. Multiple references: See also:
  87. Multiple references:
  88. Multiple references: See also:
  89. Multiple references:
  90. Multiple references: Specific examples of this program:
  91. Multiple references:
  92. Multiple references:
  93. Multiple references:
  94. Multiple references: Some conservatives criticized President Trump for the order: See also:
  95. Multiple references:
  96. Multiple references: See also:
  97. Multiple references: See also:
  98. Multiple references: See also:
  99. Multiple references: See also:
  100. Multiple references:
  101. Multiple references:
  102. Multiple references:
  103. Multiple references: See also:
  104. Multiple references:
  105. Multiple references:
  106. Multiple references:
  107. Multiple references: See also:
  108. Ciccotta, Tom (January 29, 2019). Department of Education to Investigate Anti-Male Discrimination at University of Michigan. Breitbart News. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  109. Multiple references:
  110. Multiple references: See also:
  111. Multiple references:
  112. Multiple references:
  113. Multiple references: See also:
  114. Multiple references:
  115. Multiple references: President Trump was much bolder than congressional Republicans on healthcare:
  116. Multiple references: See also:
  117. Multiple references:
  118. Svab, Petr (July 9, 2019). Number of Americans on Welfare Dropping Under Trump Administration. The Epoch Times. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  119. Rodriguez, Katherine (July 8, 2019). Food Stamp Participation Lowest in 10 Years. Breitbart News. Retrieved July 8, 2019.
  120. Rodriguez, Katherine (August 7, 2019). Food Stamp Households at Lowest Point in 9 Years. Breitbart News. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  121. Multiple references: See also:
  122. Rodriguez, Katherine (October 7, 2019). More than 2.5 Million Households Drop Off Food Stamps Under Trump. Breitbart News. Retrieved October 7, 2019.
  123. Chaney, Sarah (November 14, 2019). Fewer Jobless Americans Tap Unemployment Benefits. The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved November 14, 2019.
  124. Multiple references:
  125. Multiple references: