Essay: 2020 was a very bad year for atheism. VERY, VERY BAD. HORRIBLE

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2020 was a very bad year for atheism. VERY, VERY BAD. HORRIBLE.

In 2020, atheist controlled, mainland China was shown to cause the coronavirus pandemic through either a biolab in China or via their bizarre eating habits. And now these truly, truly additional horrible developments for the militant atheists in China! 2020 is the worst year in the history of atheism, just like Conservapedia predicted. See also: Atheism and the coronavirus pandemic and Dietary practices of atheists and Atheism and deception

Was 2020 the WORST year in the history of atheism?

Was 2020 the WORST year in the history of atheism? I will let you be the judge. But if you are an atheist, please don't engage in denialism. That's a fair request, isn't Mr. Atheist? See: Atheism and historical revisionism and Atheism and human rights violations and Atheism and mass murder


The religious are increasing as a percentage of the world's population. The irreligious/nonreligious are declining as a percentage of the world's population

See also: Desecularization and Global atheism statistics

In 2011, atheist Jacques Berlinerblau declared: "The Golden Age of Secularism has passed."[1]

On July 24, 2013, CNS News reported:

Atheism is in decline worldwide, with the number of atheists falling from 4.5% of the world’s population in 1970 to 2.0% in 2010 and projected to drop to 1.8% by 2020, according to a new report by the Center for the Study of Global Christianity at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, Mass."[2]

Professor Eric Kaufmann, who teaches at Birkbeck College, University of London, specializes in the academic area of how demographic changes affect religion/irreligion and politics. Kaufmann is an agnostic.

On December 23, 2012, Kaufmann wrote:

I argue that 97% of the world's population growth is taking place in the developing world, where 95% of people are religious.

On the other hand, the secular West and East Asia has very low fertility and a rapidly aging population... In the coming decades, the developed world's demand for workers to pay its pensions and work in its service sector will soar alongside the booming supply of young people in the third world. Ergo, we can expect significant immigration to the secular West which will import religious revival on the back of ethnic change. In addition, those with religious beliefs tend to have higher birth rates than the secular population, with fundamentalists having far larger families. The epicentre of these trends will be in immigration gateway cities like New York (a third white), Amsterdam (half Dutch), Los Angeles (28% white), and London, 45% white British.[3] [4]

At a conference Kaufmann said of religious demographic projections concerning the 21st century:

Part of the reason I think demography is very important, at least if we are going to speak about the future, is that it is the most predictable of the social sciences.

...if you look at a population and its age structure now. You can tell a lot about the future. ...So by looking at the relative age structure of different populations you can already say a lot about the future...

...Religious fundamentalism is going to be on the increase in the future and not just out there in the developing world..., but in the developed world as well.[5]

See also: Religion and migration and Growth of religious fundamentalism

Dr. Steve Turley wrote:

According to University of London scholar Eric Kaufmann’s detailed study on global demographic trends, we are in the early stages of nothing less than a demographic revolution. In Kaufmann’s words, "religious fundamentalists are on course to take over the world." There is a significant demographic deficit between secularists and conservative religionists. For example, in the U.S., while self-identified non-religionist women averaged only 1.5 children per couple in 2002, conservative evangelical women averaged 2.5 children, representing a 28 percent fertility edge. Kaufmann notes that this demographic deficit has dramatic effects over time. In a population evenly divided, these numbers indicate that conservative evangelicals would increase from 50 to 62.5 percent of the population in a single generation. In two generations, their number would increase to 73.5 percent, and over the course of 200 years, they would represent 99.4 percent. The Amish and Mormons provide contemporary illustrations of the compound effect of endogamous growth. The Amish double in population every twenty years, and projections have the Amish numbering over a million in the U.S. and Canada in just a few decades. Since 1830, Mormon growth has averaged 40 percent per decade, which means that by 2080, there may be as many as 267 million Mormons in the world, making them by 2100 anywhere from one to six percent of the world’s population.

In Europe, immigration is making the continent more religiously conservative, not less; in fact, London and Paris are some of the most religiously dense areas within their respective populations. In Britain, for example, Ultra-Orthodox or Haredi Jews constitute only 17 percent of the Jewish population but account for 75 percent of Jewish births. And in Israel, Haredi schoolchildren have gone from comprising a few percent to nearly a third of all Jewish pupils in a matter of five decades, and are poised to represent the majority of the Jewish population by 2050. Since 1970, charismatic Christians in Europe have expanded steadily at a rate of 4 percent per year, in step with Muslim growth. Currently, Laestadian Lutherans in Finland and Holland’s Orthodox Calvinists have a fertility advantage over their wider secular populations of 4:1 and 2:1 respectively.

In contrast, Kaufmann’s data projects that secularists, who consistently exemplify a low fertility rate of around 1.5 (significantly below the replacement level of 2.1), will begin a steady decline after 2030 to a mere 14 to 15 percent of the American population. Similar projections apply to Europe as well. Kaufmann thus appears to have identified what he calls "the soft underbelly of secularism," namely, demography. This is because secular liberalism entails its own “demographic contradiction,” the affirmation of the sovereign individual devoid of the restraints of classical moral structures necessitates the freedom not to reproduce. The link between sex and procreation having been broken, modernist reproduction translates into mere personal preference. It thus turns out that the radical individualism so celebrated and revered by contemporary secular propagandists is in fact the agent by which their ideology implodes.[6]

2020: Internet atheism and the coronavirus pandemic

The article Internet atheism: The thrill is gone! points out that internet atheism has been in a significant slump since 2011. See also: Internet atheism web traffic volume and Internet atheism

See also: Internet atheism and the coronavirus pandemic

Several atheist websites did very poorly during the coronavirus pandemic and lost a large amount of their traffic since the early part of 2020 (See: Internet atheism and the coronavirus pandemic).

Historically, religiosity increases during pandemics. Pew Research found people's religious faith grew during the pandemic - especially in the United States.[7] Nearly three-in-ten U.S. adults say the outbreak has boosted their faith; about four-in-ten say it has tightened family bonds.[8]

In addition, many atheist organizations have significant difficulty in getting their fellow atheist to financially support them (see: Atheist organizations and fundraising), so their web marketing budgets could have been low during the pandemic. In addition, many atheist organizations have poor fiscal management so they may not have had reserves built up before the pandemic (see: Atheist organizations and financial mismanagement).

The atheist websites might never gain that traffic back again as the number of atheists in the world is expected to drop soon after 2022 according to the scholars at the Center for the Study of Global Christianity at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.[9] Currently, the global atheist population is losing market share in terms of the world's population (see: Global atheism statistics).

A prediction of predictions. The mother of all predictions about atheism

Mr. Atheist, are you sitting down? If you have a heart attack after hearing this prediction, are you fairly close to a hospital? By the way, did you know that religious hospitals tend to be better than secular hospitals (see: Atheist hospitals).

Mr. Atheist, are you sure you want to hear it? Are you an atheist who loves the fallacy of exclusion - the most beloved of all logical fallacies by the world's atheists?

OK then. Brace yourself. It's not pretty.

Are you really, really sure you can handle the truth? Just checking one last time. See: Atheism and truth

Here is the prediction: Each new year until Jesus comes back is going to the worst year in the history of atheism as atheists will be declining as a percentage of the world's population while religious fundamentalism is going to increase.

See:

Eric Kaufmann, a professor at Birkbeck College, University of London, using a wealth of demographic studies, argues that there will be a significant increase in desecularization in the 21st century which will impact the Western World.[10]

2021 is the WORST year in the history of atheism

See also: 2021 is the WORST year in the history of atheism

2021 is the WORST year in the history of atheism. See: 2021 is the WORST year in the history of atheism

2020 was a HORRIBLE year for atheism and now this!

Will 2022 be the WORST year in the history of secular leftism?

See: Will 2022 be the WORST year in the history of secular leftism?

2022 will be the WORST year in the history of secular leftism.

See also: Will 2022 be the WORST year in the history of secular leftism?

See also

Humor:

References

  1. Berlinerblau, Jacques (February 4, 2011). "Obama at the National Prayer Breakfast". The Chronicle of Higher Education/Brainstorm blog. Retrieved on May 29, 2015.
  2. Global Study: Atheists in Decline, Only 1.8% of World Population by 2020
  3. London: A Rising Island of Religion in a Secular Sea by Eric Kaufmann, Huffington Post, 2012
  4. 97% of the world's population growth is taking place in the developing world, where 95% of people are religious, Tuesday, April 30, 2013
  5. Eric Kaufmann - Religion, Demography and Politics in the 21st Century
  6. (source: Text below the YouTube video Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth and the text was written by Dr. Steven Turley).
  7. More Americans Than People in Other Advanced Economies Say COVID-19 Has Strengthened Religious Faith, Pew Research, 2021
  8. More Americans Than People in Other Advanced Economies Say COVID-19 Has Strengthened Religious Faith, Pew Forum
  9. Status of Global Christianity, 2022, in the Context of 1900–2050