H. E. Coker

From Conservapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Horace Edward "Jim" Coker

(Southern Baptist clergyman and Christian Studies professor at Campbellsville University)

Political party Democrat

Born October 24, 1920
Andersonville, Sumter County
Georgia
Died April 17, 2003 (aged 82)
Bardstown, Nelson County
Kentucky
Spouse Mary Ellen Carson Coker (married 1944-2003, his death)

Children:
Suellen Shaw
Mark Coker

Horace Edward Coker, also known as H. E. Coker or as Jim Coker (October 24, 1920 – April 17, 2003),  was a Southern Baptist clergyman who taught Christian Studies at Campbellsville University from 1967 until his retirement in 1987.[1]

Born in Andersonville, Georgia, the site of a notorious prisoner-of-war camp in the American Civil War, Coker was a son of Early Eugene Coker (1884-1967) and the former Emily Kitchens (1883-1966). He was one of five children. He graduated in 1944 from the Baptist-affiliated Mercer University in Macon, Georgia,  with a degree in Christian Studies. He graduated in 1948 from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, with a Bachelor of Divinity degree and received his Doctor of Theology from the same institution in 1953. He served as pastor in several churches in the South, and came to Campbellsville College, as it was then known, from the pastorate of the First Baptist Church in Hodgenville in LaRue County, the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln. For twenty years, he was professor and the chairman of the Christian Studies Division. He was a member of the Campbellsville Baptist Church.[2]

On March 3, 1944, Coker wed the former Mary Ellen Carson (born 1924). The couple had two children, Suellen Shaw (born 1950) and husband Charles, and Mark Edward Coker (born 1953) and wife, Gina, all of Campbellsville. Coker died at the age of eighty-two in Bardstown in Nelson County, the site of Stephen Foster's "My Old Kentucky Home." He is interred at Brookside Cemetery in Campbellsville.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Dr. Horace Edward "Jim" Coker. Findagrave.com. Retrieved on December 14, 2017.
  2. H. E. Coker. Campbellsville.com. Retrieved on December 14, 2017.