Irreligion and the treatment of horses

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Although horses are seen as an intelligent animal by many and a useful partner in getting work accomplished in many areas around the world, there are irreligious countries that also see horses as a source of food.[1]

Below is material related to irreligion and the treatment of horses:

Irreligion and the consumption of horse meat

Geographical location of most of the irreligious

The current atheist population mostly resides in East Asia (particularly China) and in secular Europe/Australia primarily among whites.[2] See: Global atheism and Western atheism and race

Razib Khan points out in Discover Magazine, "most secular nations in the world are those of East Asia, in particular what are often termed “Confucian societies.” It is likely therefore that the majority of the world’s atheists are actually East Asian."[3] See: Asian atheism and China and atheism

Irreligion and the eating of horse meat

China produces more horse meat than any other country in the world, creating nearly half of the world’s supply of this animal protein.

The reason why it is considered a dangerous animal protein is that horses are often given a medicine called phenylbutazone [or “bute” for short] that is dangerous to humans.[4]

The article 21 Intriguing Horse Meat Consumption Statistics indicates:

Although horses are seen as an intelligent animal by many and a useful partner in getting work done in many areas around the world, there are many countries and households that also see horses as a source of animal protein. Although horse meat consumption is actually illegal in some countries, most notably the United States, it is a widely consumed product in other parts of the world and sometimes a primary part of a household’s diet.

Over 200,000 horses every year are slaughtered to create a meat supply in the European Union.

Horse Meat Consumption

The European Union is by far the largest consumer when it comes to horse meat. Not only do they produce the most of it in the world, but they are the largest importer of this animal protein as well. Canada, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, and Uruguay all export horse meat to the EU in large quantities and even the United States, where consumption of this animal protein is illegal, has slaughterhouses that produce and export the meat to the world.

China produces more horse meat than any other country in the world, creating nearly half of the world’s supply of this animal protein.

The reason why it is considered a dangerous animal protein is that horses are often given a medicine called phenylbutazone [or “bute” for short] that is dangerous to humans.[5]

Irreligious France and horse meat eating

In France, specialized butcher shops (boucheries chevalines) sell horse meat, as ordinary butcher shops were for a long time forbidden to deal in it. However, since the 1990s, it can be found in supermarket butcher shops and others.[6]

See also: French atheism

Due to its past, namely the anti-clerical French Revolution and its after effects, France has the 8th highest rate of atheism in the world with 43–54% of the population being atheists/agnostics/non-believers in God.[7] In 2015, it was estimated that at least 29% of France's population identifies as atheists and 63% identifies as non-religious.[8]

On January 8, 2019, Wikipedia (an online encyclopedia founded by an atheist and agnostic) declared:

In France, specialized butcher shops (boucheries chevalines) sell horse meat, as ordinary butcher shops were for a long time forbidden to deal in it. However, since the 1990s, it can be found in supermarket butcher shops and others.

Horse meat was famously eaten in large amounts during the 1870 Siege of Paris, when it was included in haute cuisine menus.[9]

Irreligious Sweden and horse meat eating

Smoked/cured horse meat is widely available as a cold cut under the name hamburgerkött (literally hamburgermeat).[10]

Sweden is one of the most atheistic countries in the world and the website adherents.com reported that in 2005 46 - 85% of Swedes were agnostics/atheists/non-believers in God.[11]

On January 8, 2019, Wikipedia declared:

Smoked/cured horse meat is widely available as a cold cut under the name hamburgerkött (literally hamburgermeat). It tends to be very thinly sliced and fairly salty, slightly reminiscent of deli-style ham and, as a packaged meat, may list horsemeat (as hästkött) as its primary ingredient. Several varieties of smoked sausages made from horse meat including Gustafskorv are also quite popular, especially in the province of Dalarna, where it is made.[103] It is similar to salami or metworst and is used as an alternative to them on sandwiches. It is also possible to order horse beef from some well-stocked grocery stores.[12]

Irreligious Iceland and horse meat eating

In Iceland, horse meat is eaten minced and as a steak. In addition, it is used in stews and fondues.[13]

On January 8, 2019, Wikipedia declared: "Irreligion is prevalent in Iceland, with approximately 10% of the population identifying as "convinced atheists" and a further 30% identifying as non-religious. Since the 20th century, irreligion has seen steady growth."[14]

On January 8, 2019, Wikipedia declared:

In Iceland, it is both eaten minced and as steak, also used in stews and fondue, prized for its strong flavor. It has a particular role in the culture and history of the island. The people of Iceland supposedly were reluctant to embrace Christianity for some time largely over the issue of giving up horse meat after Pope Gregory III banned horse meat consumption in 732 AD, as it was a major part of many pagan rites and sacrifice in Northern Europe.[15]

Irreligious Britain, sexual mutilations of horses and stabbings of horses

See also: British atheism

A Eurobarometer poll in 2010 reported that 37% of UK citizens "believed there is a God", 33% believe there is "some sort of spirit or life force" and 25% answered "I don't believe there is any sort of spirit, God or life force".[16]

Black stallion

In 2014, The Telegraph reported:

The British are among the most sceptical in the world about religion, a global study has found.

Just over a third of people in the UK believe religion has a positive role to play in our daily lives, compared to a global average of 59 per cent.[17]

Between 1983 and 1993 more than 160 horses were sexually mutilated and stabbed in Britain.[18] British police and animal experts have put the blame on fertility cults, rival horse owners and sadists for the attacks.[19]

Enumclaw horse sex case

See also

Notes